Scientific Program

The below program is subject to change. Check back regularly for more updates to the program.

MondayAugust 21, 2017

  • 09:00 - 12:00

    3D Forensic Art in Death Investigation

    Location: 2nd floor Boardroom W2-202, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Duncan Way (Organizer/Leader), Identification Constable, Ontario Provincial Police
    • Lecture/Practical Demonstration combination
    • Maximum number of delegates: 18
    This workshop will demonstrate the value of Forensic Art in Criminal Death Investigation, Cold Cases, and Unidentified Remains. This workshop will provide an understanding of services provided by forensic art, expected outcomes and their value to the Forensic Community. This workshop will elaborate on the disciplines of Forensic art, with a focus on the 3D Reconstruction, through presentation/lecture, case study and demonstrative examples/process.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Expert Witness Workshop

    Location: Coroners Courts (Large Courtroom), Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    John Rosen, Rosen & Company Barristers (Organizer, Leader)
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 70
    In a courtroom setting, the Expert Witness workshop will provide an insight on the most effective practices for interacting with expert witnesses, making best use of their testimony, and effectively translating their testimony to a jury.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Forensic Histopathology

    Location: Multi-headed Microscope Room (FSCC), Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Christopher Milroy (Organizer/Leader), Forensic Pathologist, Ottawa Forensic Pathology Unit (Director), The Ottawa Hospital
    • Practical Demonstration and Lecture
    • Limited Space: Maximum number of participants is 12 delegates
    This workshop will be conducted by Dr Milroy. It will involve teaching on forensic histology of interesting and controversial questions at a multi-headed microscope. Places will be limited.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Forensic Imaging Workshop

    Location: Training Room W1-221C, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Dr. Michael Pickup (Organizer/Leader), Forensic Pathologist, OFPS, Chris O’Donnell, VIFM
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    This ½ day workshop will be led by Drs. Chris O’Donnell (VIFM) and Dr. Michael Pickup (OFPS). Postmortem radiology is increasingly becoming an international standard in modern death investigation practice. The workshop will be highlighting the use of cross-sectional imaging (CT and MRI) in the investigation of death and how this non-invasive method is being leveraged as an adjunct to, and in some cases, a replacement for, classical dissection to improve efficiency and reviewability in two of the largest death investigation jurisdictions in the world. Using a case-based approach to highlight critical examination of postmortem imaging studies, attendees will gain an appreciation for common radiologic diagnoses in the context of sudden death, applications to anthropologic analyses, limitations of postmortem imaging and common interpretive errors, postmortem artefacts, and indications for advanced imaging techniques such as CT angiography and MRI.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Humanitarian and Human Rights Applications of Forensic Science

    Location: Training Room W1-221D, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Dr. Douglas H. Ubelaker (Organizer, Leader), Forensic Anthropologist, Smithsonian Institute, Luis Fondebrider, Forensic Anthropologist, Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    This workshop will familiarize delegates with both humanitarian and human rights applications of modern forensic science.  Details regarding the new Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and its sponsored projects will be presented. This workshop will also raise awareness of the nature of forensic applications in this global arena. The community will learn how to become involved and what resources are available.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Identifying Missing Migrants: The National Institute of Justice's Interdisciplinary Working Group and Missing Persons Program

    Location: Training Room W1-241, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Charles Heurich (Organizer/Leader), Senior Physical Scientist, National Institute of Justice, Dr. Lori Baker, Forensic Anthropologist, Baylor University, Lance Gima, Chief (retired), Bureau of Forensic Services, California Department of Justice, Dr. Bruce Anderson, Forensic Anthropologist, Pima County Medical Examiner's Office
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    The objective of this workshop is to inform the community of the collaborative efforts of the National Institute of Justice and other government and non-governmental agencies with regard to the identification of missing migrants in the U.S. as well as Americans missing in the countries bordering the U.S. These efforts may serve as a model to other countries trying to address this issue. NIJ will also present on their National Missing and Unidentified Persons System known as NamUs. The impact on the forensic science community will be in showing them how various agencies can work together collaboratively and use a variety of forensic and investigative disciplines to address the issue of missing persons or those unidentified. The emphasis will be on the more difficult cases where verification of one’s identity cannot be completed by a single country, where people may have traveled long distances, and with little or no notice to friends and family.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Inter-Professional Collaboration for the Investigation of Sudden Cardiac Death

    Location: Training Room W1-221B, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Dr. Joaquin Lucena (Organizer/Leader), Chief Forensic Pathologist, Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences (Seville, Spain), Dr. Kristopher Cunningham, Cardiovascular Pathologist, OFPS, Dr. Stephen D. Cohle, Chief Medical Examiner, Kent County, Michigan, Dr. Silke Grabherr, Director, Institute of Legal Medicine (Lausanne)
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    Any sudden, unexpected or unexplained death, mainly in the young, is a main reason for a medico-legal investigation in most countries of the world. The underlying cause of sudden death is most frequently cardiovascular, with coronary atherosclerotic disease as the leading cause of death in victims over 35 years of age, whereas with those who are younger than 35, the leading cause is sudden unexplained death. Progress made in the fields of molecular biology and human genetics have identified the genetic origin of many cardiac diseases, which can lead to both, structural (e.g. HCM, ARVC/D) and arrhythmogenic abnormalities (e.g. LQT syndrome, Brugada syndrome) and result in SCD. Autopsy-negative SCD are most often thought to be the consequence of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome, and molecular autopsy is recommended in these instances. The aim of this workshop, eminently practical, is to update the knowledge in sudden unexpected death related to cardiovascular pathology and to improve the skills in the diagnosis and approach of SCD in the setting of forensic medicine and pathology. After attending this presentation, delegates will learn:
    1. The practical approach of the medico-legal investigation of a SCD
    2. The use of modern technologies introduced recently in the evaluation of SCD cases, i.e. postmortem genetic testing (also called molecular autopsy), and postmortem radiological examination by CT, CT-angiography and MRI
    3. Some practical cases of SCD related to medical liability
    Delegates will know about their possibilities and limitations and about the new role of forensic pathologists considering the genetic origin of pathologies resulting in SCD.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Medicolegal Autopsy Techniques

    Location: Autopsy Teaching Suite (FSCC), Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Michael Pollanen (Organizer/Leader), Chief Forensic Pathologist, OFPS, President, International Association of Forensic Sciences
    • Practical Demonstration
    • Maximum number of delegates: 10
    • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 13:00 – 16:00; Tuesday from 09:00 – 12:00 and Tuesday from 13:00 – 15:00
    • Please note that this workshop is only open to delegates from Low-Middle Income Countries
    At this workshop, delegates will learn how to conduct the basic dissections required in a medicolegal autopsy. The workshop will be conducted in the FSCC autopsy room and take the form of practical instruction. The specific basic techniques that will be taught include: sampling for physical evidence, swabbing, opening the body, evisceration, organ dissection, and bloodless layered dissection of the anterior neck. If time permits, the removal of vertebral arteries will also be demonstrated.
  • 09:00 - 16:00

    Behind Crimes in the Home: Family Violence Workshop

    Location: Training Room W2-201, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Dr. Angela Williams (Organizer, Leader), Senior Clinical Forensic Physician, VIFM, Dr. John Gall, University of Melbourne
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 18
    Violence in the home is a major public health issue affecting many women and their children, families and men worldwide. This intensive workshop is an introduction to the forensic aspects of family violence and will be delivered by a forensic specialist and expert in clinical forensic medicine. This intensive workshop will provide delegates with the skills to recognize assess and respond to family violence issues. At the end of the intensive workshop, delegates will have:
    1. A deeper understanding of the problem as a major public health issue
    2. Increased confidence in recognising and responding to family violence in practice
    3. An overview of the impacts family violence has on women, children, men and families
    4. Skills in consulting with victims of violence and identifying potential risk factors
    5. Improved skills in identifying, documenting and interpreting injuries
    6. Understanding of the principles of evidence collection and where evidence could be collected in these cases
    7. Experience writing medicolegal reports and providing evidence to court
    8. Be able to recognise and respond to child abuse and abuse of the elderly
    9. An awareness of the dilemmas, limitations and therefore opportunities to improve clinical forensic medical services to victims of interpersonal violence.
    The forensic community will benefit from receiving up-to-date international information regarding a highly important and contemporary topic.  There is an opportunity through awareness and education to improve the evidence collection, and provision of evidence to the courtroom and to design better services with future cases in mind.
  • 09:00 - 16:00

    Forensic Botanical Evidence and Death Investigations

    Location: Training Room W1-238, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Dr. Gerard Courtin (Organizer, Leader), Forensic Botanist, Professor Emeritus, Laurentian University, Dr. Scott I. Fairgrieve, Professor, Forensic Anthropologist, Laurentian University
    • Combination of Practical Demonstration and Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 20
    To provide delegates with a perspective on a branch of forensic science that is an under-appreciated or under-utilized resource.  The natural tendency for the investigating team to focus on the body can lead to the loss of evidence associated with the immediate surroundings.  It is clearly understood that whereas the actual analysis and interpretation is the purview of the specialist, investigators may be able to gather evidence otherwise overlooked by having an appreciation for the plants and their environment that form part of the scene. Evidence can range from individual cells (e.g., Pollen), to plant parts, to entire organisms and the soil in which they grow.  Furthermore, the entire environment of the scene under investigation may have relevance. The workshop is designed to familiarize both forensic specialists and law enforcement agencies to a form of trace evidence that is commonly overlooked and to emphasize the role that plant material and soils both in respect to long-term PMI and linkages such as: perpetrator and victim, persons and vehicles, and secondary to primary scenes in the case of a body having been moved.  Plant and soil require special treatment for seizure and preservation for future examination in the laboratory or as evidence to be presented in court.
  • 09:00 - 16:00

    Getting More from your Forensic Lab through Technology and Collaboration

    Location: Training Room W1-221A, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Eamonn McGee (Organizer/Leader), Christine McCarthy, Aleksandra Stryjnik, Jonathan Millman, all are staff of the Centre of Forensic Sciences
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    There is increasing demand from clients of forensic labs to provide on-site testing and expertise at crime scenes, CBRNE scenes and clandestine drug and explosives labs. The availability of user-friendly test kits and portable instruments make it possible for law enforcement agencies to do their own testing, if labs are not willing or are unable to provide these services. Forensic managers and practitioners will learn about current models and best practices of peer laboratories around the world that are providing on-site DNA, drugs, explosives and CBRN services to their clients. They will be made aware of emerging technologies that may be used to transition forensic services from the laboratory to the scene. Presenters for this workshop will be drawn from the forensic, law enforcement, military, judicial and private sectors. They will be current practitioners with specialized knowledge and experience. These experts will address on-site testing that can assist an investigation in real time with subsequent testing in the forensic lab; the practical considerations of generating lab quality data in the field and whether scientific or law enforcement personnel are best suited to carry out the testing.
  • 09:00 - 16:00

    Global History of Forensic Medicine

    Location: Training Room W1-240, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Dr. Jeffrey Jentzen, University of Michigan, Department of Pathology (Organizer, Leader), Ian Burney, University of Manchester, Christopher Handlin, University of Notre Dame, Matthew Sommer, Stanford University, Katherine Watson, Brookes University, UK, Vicki E. Daniel, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dan Asen, Rutgers University-Newark
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    This workshop will impact the forensic science community by illustrating the seminal events in the history of forensic science.  It will enhance critical thinking across a broad area of forensic science including questioned documents, forensic psychiatry, criminalistics, forensic medicine, judicial practices, disaster management, blood spatter interpretation, forensic toxicology and political interventions into forensic practices.  It will enhance the delegate’s appreciation and awareness of the foundations of forensic medicine and science.
  • 09:00 - 16:00

    Logical Framework Approach and Signature Examination: What for?

    Location: 2nd floor Boardroom E2-204, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Liv Cadola (Organizer/Leader), PhD candidate, School of Criminal Justice, University of Lausanne, Tobin Tanaka, Forensic Document Examiner, Canada Border Services Agency, Linton A. Mohammed, Forensic Science Consultants Inc.
    • Lecture/Practical Demonstration combination
    • Maximum number of delegates: 20
    The objective of this workshop is to present to document examiners a probabilistic approach to the evaluation of findings. At the end of the workshop, delegates should be able to apply a likelihood ratio approach to the interpretation of findings in their casework as well as be able to present their findings in court and in their report in a transparent way, and avoiding the pitfalls of interpretation. Recent years have seen various publications arguing that the Likelihood Ratio is a logical and optimal approach to interpret and evaluate forensic findings. However, there is still a great deal of unknowns, fears and critics surrounding the implementation of such an approach in practical casework as well as on its suitability when the evidence is presented in court. This workshop aims to explain and hopefully demystify how this approach could be applied to a domain where hard (statistical) data is not available, but examiners still reach informed opinions based on their training and expertise.
  • 09:00 - 16:00

    Novel Psychoactive Substances: Don't Try This at Home

    Location: Training Room W1-239, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Marc R. Pelletier (Organizer, Leader), Assistant Section Head- Toxicology Centre of Forensic Sciences, Dimitri Gerostamoulos, Head- Forensic Sciences & Chief Toxicologist, Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine, Simon Elliott, Consultant Forensic Sciences & Chief Toxicologist, ROAR Forensics, Chad Maheux, Forensic Chemist, Canada Border Services Agency
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    The high potential for toxicity and the wide-spread availability of NPSs has overwhelmed the capacity of forensic laboratories to keep pace with developing new methods for their detection. Additionally, scant literature exists describing their mechanism of action and concentrations associated with serious toxicity. The significant social, legal, and analytical issues associated with synthetic cathinones (bath salts) and synthetic cannabinoids (Spice, K2) have been widely experienced in the forensic community; however, the worst might yet be to come with the proliferation and availability of synthetic opioids. The emphasis of this workshop will be to increase awareness of forensic practitioners of the deadly potential of synthetic opioids. The educational objective of this workshop is to introduce forensic practitioners and other stakeholders, e.g., law enforcement, medical examiners, to these new deadly compounds and to share strategies to best assist in death investigations where use of NPSs is suspected.
  • 13:00 - 16:00

    Classifying By What Means (BWM) Death Occurred: Common Dilemmas

    Location: Training Room W1-221D, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Dr. Jayantha Herath (Organizer/Leader), Medical Director, OFPS, Dr. David Eden, Regional Supervising Coroner-Inquests, Office of the Chief Coroner, Dr. Kris Cunningham, Cardiovascular Pathologist, OFPS
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    Delegates will learn about opportunities for improving classification of By What Means (BWM), by discussion of:
    1. The essential principles of the five BWM classifications used in most North American medicolegal jurisdictions, and many other countries: Natural, Accident, Suicide, Homicide and Undetermined.
    2. The difficulties inherent in classifying the diverse and complex cases we investigate.
    3. Developing best practices for classification, to provide the most consistent, reproducible, meaningful and useful results.
    4. Case examples.
    Classification of BWM is one of the most important duties of the death investigator. Findings are often contentious, and are important both in individual cases such as a family’s response to a finding of suicide, and in the aggregate, for example, designing prevention programs for accidental deaths. This workshop is intended to stimulate discussion about how we currently classify deaths, and how jurisdictions can work internally and with each other in order to improve the consistency and comparability of BWM classification.
  • 13:00 - 16:00

    Crossing Data on Missing Migrants and Unidentified Remains across the Central American-Mexico-U.S. Border

    Location: Training Room W1-241, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Dr. Mercedes Doretti (Organizer/Leader), Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    After attending this workshop, delegates will understand existing modalities to exchange genetic data among other forensic data, with the purpose of identifying missing migrants among the countries of the Central America-Mexico-US corridor. This workshop will also elaborate on strategies to improve and increase the identification of remains that correspond to migrants. The identification of missing migrants along a corridor involving multiple countries implies the need to share information amongst countries and national agencies. This workshop outlines the challenges posed by cases where unidentified remains are recovered in countries that differ from the usual missing migrant communities, and the current status of data exchange in the Central America-Mexico-US region, focusing on DNA data. This workshop will describe the challenges faced by such an undertaking and the possible ways to apply this model to other migrant corridors of the world, such as the Mediterranean and Africa. This workshop will impact the forensic science community by discussing current and potential collaborations in the exchange of cross-national forensic data, particularly genetic data. The aim being to significantly increase identifications, and also to show practices that may be useful in other migrant corridors across the globe.
  • 13:00 - 16:00

    Medicolegal Autopsy Techniques

    Location: Autopsy Teaching Suite (FSCC), Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Michael Pollanen (Organizer/Leader), Chief Forensic Pathologist, OFPS, President, International Association of Forensic Sciences
    • Practical Demonstration
    • Maximum number of delegates: 10
    • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 09:00 – 12:00; Tuesday from 09:00 – 12:00 and Tuesday from 13:00 – 15:00
    • Please note that this workshop is only open to delegates from Low-Middle Income Countries
    At this workshop, delegates will learn how to conduct the basic dissections required in a medicolegal autopsy. The workshop will be conducted in the FSCC autopsy room and take the form of practical instruction. The specific basic techniques that will be taught include: sampling for physical evidence, swabbing, opening the body, evisceration, organ dissection, and bloodless layered dissection of the anterior neck. If time permits, the removal of vertebral arteries will also be demonstrated.
  • 13:00 - 16:00

    Streamlined Collection and Processing of Biological Evidence in Sexual Assaults and Sexual Assault Homicides

    Location: Training Room W1-221C, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Jonathan Millman (Organizer/Leader), Dr. Maja Popovic, Forensic Biologist, Centre of Forensic Sciences, Dr. John Fernandes, Forensic Pathologist, Hamilton Health Sciences, Sheila Macdonald, Women’s College Hospital (Toronto)
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    Sexual assault investigations contribute significantly to the workload of many forensic biology laboratories.  Many jurisdictions have struggled with the burden of this workload, leading to large backlogs in the processing of sexual assault evidence kits (SAEKs).  This workshop will explore approaches that laboratories and practitioners have employed to improve the collection of SAEK samples, streamline their processing and improve the results obtained.  It will also promote a standardized collection of samples and documentation in the post mortem case with various options to maximize the quality of collection of evidence, ensure appropriate documentation of injuries and post mortem management. Forensic practitioners from the province of Ontario have been leaders in this field, introducing standardized and novel approaches that have improved patient care, significantly reduced turnaround times for SAEK sample processing while improving the sensitivity of analysis and reducing costs.  Ontario has also been working to improve and standardize the collection of samples at autopsies of suspected sexual assault-homicide victims. The interdisciplinary faculty will include sexual assault nurse practitioners, forensic pathologists and forensic scientists.  Contributions will also be sought from practitioners in other jurisdictions with novel approaches to address sexual assault investigations and sample processing.
  • 13:00 - 15:00

    Dental Age Assessment in Adults

    Location: W1-221B, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Professor Hrvoje Brkic (Organizer/Leader), School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb
    • Lecture and Practical Demonstration
    • 25 participants
    Dental age assessment is an established method used in clinical practice, forensic procedures and in the paleo-anthropological research for estimating the age of a deceased person at the time of death. This workshop should be of great interest to Forensic Odontologists, Clinical Odontologists, Forensic Anthropologists, and Archaeologists. Dental age assessment is an established method used in clinical practice, forensic procedures and in the paleo-anthropological research for estimating the age of a deceased person at the time of death. Recent methods of dental age estimation in humans start as early as the time of embryo development and last for as long as there is a single tooth left in the mouth. For children the atlas techniques when comparing the development phase and the phase of erupting are used. As opposed to adults, where the tooth has ended his race and it is much more difficult to determine the dental age. In these cases person's lifetime changes on dental tissues are very useful for determining their dental age. During the workshop, each delegate will get familiar with several different methods for dental age assessment in adults by Gustafson, Johanson, Bang & Ramm, Kvaal, Solheim, and Cameriere.

TuesdayAugust 22, 2017

  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Forensic Histopathology

    Location: Multi-headed Microscope Room (FSCC), Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Christopher Milroy (Organizer/Leader), Forensic Pathologist, Ottawa Forensic Pathology Unit (Director), The Ottawa Hospital
    • Practical Demonstration and Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 12
    • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 09:00 – 12:00
    This workshop will be conducted by Dr Milroy. It will involve teaching on forensic histology of interesting and controversial questions at a multi-headed microscope. Space will be limited to 12 participants.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Evidence Management: From the Crime Scene to the Courtroom

    Location: W1-221C, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Professor Ashraf Mozayani (Organizer/Leader), Texas Southern University, Casie Parish Fisher, St. Edward’s University, Carol Henderson, Stetson University, School of Law, Zeno Geradts, Netherlands Forensic Institute
    • Lecture
    • 25 participants 
    Proper documentation, collection and packaging techniques are essential throughout the criminal justice process and it begins with work conducted at the crime scene.  This workshop aims to give hands on experience and demonstrations on the proper ways to document and secure various types of evidence.  It will also address the legal and ethical aspects of evidence management. This workshop will:
    1. Identify and discuss different types of physical evidence
    2. Review the importance of evidence documentation, collection and preservation
    3. Practice evidence documentation, collection and preservation techniques
    4. Discuss the legal and ethical components related to evidence management
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Better Law Through Science: How Cooperation can Improve the Presentation of Forensic Evidence in Court

    Location: 2nd floor Boardroom W2-202, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    K. A. Fares Bannon (Organizer/Leader), Crown Counsel, Ministry of the Attorney General, Glen Donald, Glen S. Donald Law
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 18
    As forensic science (especially DNA evidence) continues to play a larger role in criminal prosecutions, it becomes crucial for all parties to be familiar enough with the various technologies so that they can effectively participate in the presentation of that evidence. Defense counsels need access to scientists well in advance of trial so that they can consider testing or analyses that fit with their theory of the case. Prosecutors must be able to elicit testimony in chief that will assist the trier of fact in understanding highly technical evidence and applying it to the case. The objective of this workshop is to demonstrate how cooperation amongst forensic scientists, defense counsel and prosecutors will save time and money, will contribute to the best interests of the administration of justice and will further the ultimate objective of finding the truth. This workshop is designed to improve pre-trial communication between counsel (defense and prosecution) and expert witnesses with a view towards more efficient litigation. Forensic scientists will be provided with: strategies for establishing sharing of information protocols with justice sector partners; tools for communicating scientific information to lawyers, judges and police; and, tips for responding to differing regional litigation challenges.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Bloodstain Pattern Analysis in Canada and the Implementation of Artificial Fluids as Blood Substitutes for Education and Training in Forensic Science

    Location: Training Room W1-241, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Mike Illes, Professor, Trent University (Organizer/Leader), Theresa Stotesbury (Trent University), Trevor McLeod (Ontario Provincial Police)
    • Combination of Practical Demonstration and Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 20
    In this workshop, the basics of bloodstain pattern recognition will be discussed and the advantageous features of implementing a synthetic blood substitute (SBS) in education and training will be introduced. The delegates will be provided an opportunity to analyze complex bloodstain patterns that have been created with a blood red SBS and then with multi coloured SBS.  Historically, it has been difficult teaching sequencing and pattern recognition when analyzing complex bloodstain patterns because the blood is one colour. The visual patterns can easily be conflated for beginning analysts. In this workshop the use of a coloured SBS will be introduced, where each pattern within a group could be made with a distinct colour (Stotesbury et al. 2015) with the aim of increasing understanding of and accuracy with evidence-based analysis. The coloured SBS provides a unique and simple technological development that will cause a paradigm shift in the teaching strategies for bloodstain pattern analysis.  This novel material now enables a visual and powerful technique for disentangling complex patterns for students to deepen their understanding of BPA. Previously, this was a missing step in bloodstain pattern analysis education that made it difficult for students to conceptualize and identify patterns in complex multi-pattern analysis.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Cultural, Legal, and Forensic Challenges in the Prosecution of Sexually Violent Crimes

    Location: Training Room W1-221D, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Marc R. Pelletier (Organizer, Leader), Assistant Section Head- Toxicology Centre of Forensic Sciences, Anita Parker, Native Service Worker, John Howard Society, Leila Mehkeri, Assistant Crown Attorney, Ministry of the Attorney General, Kelly Bowie, Forensic Biologist, Centre of Forensic Sciences
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    Recent trials, e.g., R v Gomeshi, have received high profile media attention. Misconceptions regarding the legal process and media coverage of the testimony of complainants have polarized society and undermined confidence in the criminal justice system. These issues are magnified when the complainant is a racialized woman. The information provided in this workshop will be of interest to a wide range of stakeholders including first line workers, e.g., sexual assault examination nurses, mental health workers and support staff, prosecutors, and members of the judiciary. The goal of this workshop is to support the criminal justice system in regards to the effective prosecution of sexually violent crimes.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Human Rights- Engineering Sciences, Electrical Shock, Torture, Electrocution, Human Test Subjects, Explosives, Biomechanics, Forensic Linguistics

    Location: Training Room W1-240, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Helmut G. Brosz (Organizer, Leader), Institute of Forensic Electro-Pathology, John Nixon, Athena Research and Consulting LLC, Prof. David Pienkowski, University of Kentucky, Dr. Carol Chaski, Institute for Linguistic Evidence, Dr. Laura Liptai, Biomedical Forensics , and Judge Stephanie Domitrovitch, JD, PhD., Sixth Judicial district of PA
    • Lecture and demonstration
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    After attending this workshop, with a focus on human rights, delegates will be able to:
    1. Identify electrical injury, shock, torture, homicide, mass electrocution and genocide, accidental death for various electrical circumstances.
    2. Properly document (Photograph and draw) electrical defects to the human body resulting from torture.
    3. Understand the scientific basis as to the application of electricity to the human body.
    4. The effect explosives and land mines have on  Human rights
    5. Autonomous Vehicle and pre-programmed Human rights decisions -Biomechanics
    6. Forensic Linguistics as a tool for identifying perpetrators.
    7. The Human rights of Engineering subjects
    The workshop will impact the forensic science community by equipping delegates with the Human Rights issues associated with the  theoretical and practical knowledge to investigate or study  victims of electrical, bio-mechanical, explosive injuries and death.
  • 09:00 - 12:00

    Medicolegal Autopsy Techniques

    Location: Autopsy Teaching Suite (FSCC), Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Michael Pollanen (Organizer/Leader), Chief Forensic Pathologist, OFPS, President, International Association of Forensic Sciences
    • Practical Demonstration
    • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 09:00 – 12:00; Monday from 13:00 – 15:00 and Tuesday from 13:00 – 15:00
    • Please note that this workshop is only open to delegates from Low-Middle Income Countries
    • Limited Space: Maximum number of participants is 10 delegates
    At this workshop, delegates will learn how to conduct the basic dissections required in a medicolegal autopsy. The workshop will be conducted in the FSCC autopsy room and take the form of practical instruction. The specific basic techniques that will be taught include: sampling for physical evidence, swabbing, opening the body, evisceration, organ dissection, and bloodless layered dissection of the anterior neck. If time permits, the removal of vertebral arteries will also be demonstrated.
  • 09:00 - 15:00

    Achieving Accreditation: Managing the Process

    Location: 2nd floor Boardroom W2-201, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Mark Mogle (Organizer/Leader), International Criminal Investigative Assistance Program (ICITAP), U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Terry Mills, ICITAP, U.S. DOJ- Engility Corporation, Ted Smith, ICITAP, U.S. DOJ- Engility Corporation
    • Lecture
    As past work in forensic science has come under increasing scrutiny, the profession needs to demonstrate a commitment to providing reliable information to the criminal justice system.  A systematic feedback loop such as in the ISO quality management model is essential in a profession aiming for continuous improvement. Accreditation ensures that processes are scientifically sound through validation as well as provides a mechanism to find potential problems and take corrective action. This workshop will review ICITAP’s experience in assisting laboratories in the global forensic community through the accreditation process and highlight the challenges encountered in international settings.  Laboratory accreditation requires a significant investment of time and resources in Western countries.  A laboratory attempting to be the first in their country or region to become accredited faces an even more difficult endeavor.  Achieving international accreditation is a long process that requires development of a management planning, proper financial support, and administration of a rigorous quality assurance program. Additionally, scientists must understand the capabilities and limitations of their discipline to validate processes and develop reliable standard operating procedures. The presenters will review an approach to the accreditation process that has been successful in the international community.  To highlight the aspects of a successful program, the presentation will feature a review of ICITAP’s current efforts in Mexico under the Merida Initiative, a security cooperation agreement between the United States and Mexico.  ICITAP has already assisted a few Mexican forensic laboratories and crime scene units in Mexico become accredited under the ISO 17025 and 17020 standards.  ICITAP and the Department of State share a common goal of assisting all Mexican State laboratories meet the accreditation standards over the next several years.
  • 09:00 - 15:00

    Disaster Response in the Asia-Pacific Region: Asia Pacific Medico-Legal Agencies

    Location: Coroner's Courtroom B, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Liz Manning (Organizer/Leader), Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine, Mohd Shah Mahmood, National Institute of Forensic Medicine- Kuala Lumpur, Professor Morio Iino, Tottori University- Japan, Dr. Nak-Eun Chung, Director, National Forensic Service- South Korea
    • Combination of Practical Demonstration and Lecture
    This workshop by the Asia Pacific Medico-Legal Agencies (APMLA) network of forensic medical institutions will provide an overview of the world's most disaster-prone region and some insights into the innovative responses being undertaken by its forensic medical and scientific institutions in the Asia Pacific region.  The Asia Pacific Region is the world's most disaster-prone. In the 2005-2014 period the region accounted for 60% of the world's disaster related deaths in 1,625 events and 80% of disaster -affected populations. The region is prone to floods, typhoons, earthquakes, tsunamis and mudslides. Other disasters include plane and train crashes, deaths related to clandestine border crossings, building collapses and terrorist events. The Asia Pacific region is also home to more than half of the world's poorest people. As a consequence, the region is home to some of the most experienced disaster response practitioners. This workshop is presented by the APMLA network of 20 forensic medical institutions from 18 nations in the region. The workshop will provide a range of presentations on recent disaster responses by practitioners. It will also include a demonstration of the MIM Mass ID Manager, a sophisticated and innovative software system designed by Korea DVI to support human identification in mass casualty disasters. The APMLA's new Guideline on the Management of Fragmented Human Remains in Disasters will also be launched at this workshop.
  • 09:00 - 15:00

    Forensic Imaging & Virtopsy Workshop

    Location: Training Room W1-221A, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Michael Thali (Organizer/Leader), Professor, Institute of Forensic Medicine (Zurich), Silke Grabherr (Organizer/Leader), Professor, University Center of Legal Medicine, Lausanne-Geneva, Lorenzo Campana, Department of Forensic Imaging, University Center of Legal Medicine, Lausanne-Geneva, Wolf Schweitzer, Forensic Pathologist, Institute of Forensic Medicine (Zurich), Thomas D. Ruder, Forensic Radiologist, Institute of Forensic Medicine (Zurich), Lars Ebert, Institute of Forensic Medicine (Zurich), Pia Baumann, Department of Forensic Imaging, University Center of Legal Medicine, University of Lausanne, Kewin Ducrot, Department of Forensic Imaging, University Center of Legal Medicine, Lausanne-Geneva, Kirsten Busse, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    Forensic imaging is more and more widespread today, especially in Europe. Many different methods exist that all have their own strength and limitations. Virtopsy is a toolbox of modern and advanced scanning techniques that are used to significantly enhance conventional forensic autopsy procedures. They now contain post mortem computed tomography (PMCT), post mortem magnetic resonance imaging (PMMRI), post mortem angiography and optical surface capture. Today, different centres are starting to implement imaging techniques or are planning their introduction. In order to identify the technique of choice for a centre or a specific case, it is necessary to be familiar with the existing methods and with the formation of the personnel working with on them. Today, working groups and centers exist that allow training in forensic imaging and exchange of data and knowledge. It is therefore important for the scientific community to have an update about such information.   During different lectures, detailed explanations will be given about the techniques that can be employed. But also specific medico-legal questions such as the age estimation of living persons will be treated in the lectures. During the presentations, the delegates will become familiar with the imaging toolbox, the Virtopsy® project and different trainings that are offered in for forensic pathologists, radiologists and radiographers. Additionally, the theoretical knowledge will be accompanied by practical instructions. The work on real radiological data and practical hands-on trainings for radiological image reading as well as a demonstration of 3D-surface scanning will help the delegates become familiar with the application of the techniques.
  • 09:00 - 15:00

    Forensic Science, the Bar and the Bench

    Location: 2nd floor Boardroom E2-204, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Tobin Tanaka (Organizer, Leader), Forensic Document Examiner, Canada Border Services Agency
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 20
    This workshop will benefit Canadian and international forensic scientists by exposing them to: the areas of forensic science that they are less familiar with, as well as the interaction with the legal community. For the legal community it will offer an opportunity to learn about a variety of forensic sciences and to provide an opportunity for dialogue with the scientists. This workshop will also provide an opportunity to learn how individual forensic science specialisations play a role in the broader forensic and legal system.  This also provides an opportunity for the forensic science community to find out from the "ultimate client" (the legal system) whether the forensic science reports and testimony are understood.
  • 09:00 - 15:00

    Humanitarian Forensic Action: An Emerging Field in Forensic Science

    Location: Training Room W1-221B, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Morris Tidball-Binz, Head of Forensic Services, International Committee of the Red Cross (Organizer, Leader), Dr. Douglas Ubelaker, Smithsonian Institute, Dr. Stephen Cordner, VIFM, Dr. Duarte Nuno Vieira, University of Coimbra
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    After attending this workshop, delegates will become familiar with the emerging field of forensic science applied to humanitarian forensic action worldwide, including relevant normative and practical considerations for investigations applied to the recovery, documentation, management and identification of the dead from armed conflicts and catastrophes A multidisciplinary panel of international experts will share their recommendations, experiences, and lessons learned in the practice of humanitarian forensic action. Topics for discussion will range from applicable legal frameworks; the integration of various forensic disciplines for the search, recovery, analysis, identification and management of the dead in humanitarian operations, to research needs and opportunities and future perspectives in this new field of forensic science.
  • 09:00 - 15:00

    Recognition and Safe Handling of Peroxide-based and other Homemade Explosives

    Location: Training Room W1-238, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Eamonn McGee (Organizer/Leader), Liam MacManus, Stuart Sagara, Gavin Edmondstone, all are staff of the Centre of Forensic Sciences
    • Combination of Practical Demonstration and Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    Explosives made from common household materials (HME) were used in the terrorist attacks in Paris and Brussels. TATP is a sensitive and unstable primary high explosive used by terrorists because it is relatively easy, though risky to make, and the precursors are cheap and can be purchased without raising suspicion. Delegates at this workshop will learn about the recognition and safe handling of peroxide based explosives (TATP, HMTD and MEKP) through presentations, videos, case studies and hands-on demonstrations of their properties using small amounts of the real materials. Information on precursors, in-process and finished products and simple field tests that can differentiate between an energetic homemade explosive and a white powder drug such as cocaine will be presented. The properties of other common HME and their precursors will be presented and how they can be safely tested and identified on-site.
  • 09:00 - 15:00

    Role of Forensic Doctors in Clinical Forensic Medicine: An International Perspective

    Location: Training Room W1-239, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Professor Eric Baccino, University Hospital of Montpellier (Organizer, Leader), Dr. Jason Payne-James, Specialist in Forensic & Legal Medicine, Dr. John Gall, University of Melbourne, Dr Laurent Martrille, University Hospital of Nancy
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    This workshop will provide an international perspective on the stakes in clinical forensic medicine and how it impacts the victims and the medical forensic community The workshop will also elaborate on the increasing role forensic doctors have to play in order to preserve both the interest of victims and the future of our speciality, which cannot rely only on forensic pathology.
    1. Each speaker will present in detail the organisation of clinical forensic medicine in their own country (Australia, UK and France) and will present on the countries that are part of their local geographic area (Asia, Northern and continental Europe). The variety, advantages and weaknesses of systems will be analysed, providing a unique and contemporary overview of the international situation in the field.
    2. Each speaker will then present on a specific topic - child abuse, sexual abuse, elderly abuse and age determination of living persons (migrants) - in order to give practical examples from their organisations and to also provide actual and specialised information on these subjects.
    3. A general presentation of the multiple impacts of violence on victims (health, social, financial, judicial) will be given.
    4. We will show why and how forensic doctors and their forensic units have the capacity to help these victims not only from a judicial point of view, but also from a therapeutic perspective.
    5. Propositions for the future of clinical forensic medicine will be discussed, taking into account the various local conditions.
  • 12:30 - 15:00

    The Uses of Cross-Polarized Light Sources and Infrared Wavelengths During Post-Mortem Examinations and Documentation of Forensic Evidence

    Location: Training Room W1-240 (tentative location), Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    David Larraguibel (Organizer, Leader), Forensic Photography Technologist, Ontario Forensic Pathology Service, Vi-Chi Tran, Forensic Photography Technologist Ontario Forensic Pathology Service
    • Lecture and practical demonstration
    • Maximum number of delegates: 15
    •   The addition of Cross-polarization and infrared imaging will augment the collection of imaging tools available to the forensic investigator, adding visualization techniques which function beyond the limits of human vision. The barriers for entry into usage of these techniques are low. The cost of the equipment is between $100-$800 CAD, and the techniques do not require deep knowledge of photography or optical physics. The operation and limitations are easily taught and identified. The potential impact for the forensic science community is high, especially for services in developing nations. The polarization gels used during the workshop will still be operational and I recommend they be included as part of a “take home” package which the attendees can install on their own equipment at their home service. The usage of these techniques can aid greatly in the documentation of tattoos, markings and traumatic injury in; populations with dark skin, victims of thermogenic trauma, skin which has been altered by the effects of decomposition. These techniques are also highly useful in documenting; gross anatomy specimens and evidence with highly reflective properties, clothing with highly light absorbing properties.
  • 13:00 - 15:00

    3D Documentation Technologies for Medical Examinations

    Location: Training Room W1-221C, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Eugene Liscio (Organizer/Leader), Instructor, University of Toronto (Mississauga)
    • Lecture/Practical Demonstration combination
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    As with any area in Forensics, complete and accurate documentation is vital to keeping proper records and also being able to use the data for further analysis and presentation in court.  Today, there are several options available to medical examiners that are relatively low cost and can still provide a quality three dimensional record of the autopsy.  Documenting in 3D allows for measurements to be made on complex surfaces and provides the ability to measure area, volume, angular and linear data. This workshop will present different technologies that can be used to document injuries or entire bodies at medical examinations.  Technologies covered will encompass, structured light, laser scanning and photogrammetry based systems.  Software packages and live demonstrations will be shown to encourage delegates to incorporate 3D technologies in their examinations.
  • 13:00 - 15:00

    Application of Quality Tools in the Practice of Forensic Medicine

    Location: Training Room W1-221D, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Mamdouh K. Zaki (Organizer/Leader), Consultant of Forensic Medicine, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Dr. Kholoud S. Alsowayigh, Consultant of Forensic Medicine, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 25
    In the present day, the use of quality tools in the practice of forensic medicine is required in order to improve the organization's efficiency, productivity and quality of forensic services. Proper determination of work flow and technical procedures in a systematic approach requires the knowledge of a simple kit of quality tools and techniques. The effective use of these tools and techniques require their application by the people who actually work on the processes, and their commitment to this will only be possible if they are assured that management cares about improving quality. The organization's leaders must show they are committed by providing the training and implementation support necessary. Since 2012, the Jeddah Forensic Medicine Center is the first center in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to apply these tools according to ISO-Standards. This workshop will strive:
    1. To understand the basic types of quality tools, and adopting this culture within an organization.
    2. To recognize the values of quality tools in the practice of forensic medicine
    3. To impart the basic skills required for the use of proper tools for process improvement in the daily work of forensic medicine.
    4. To elaborate on the use of quality tools for problem identification and decreasing costs.
    5. To show the leaders of forensic medicine organizations their roles in the development and application of these tools in an organization.
  • 13:00 - 15:00

    Criminal Analysis of Youth and Adult Violence: Teen Dating Violence and Homicide Crimes

    Location: 2nd floor Boardroom W2-202, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Catia Pontebeira (Organizer/Leader), University Institute of Maia, Ruben Sousa, University Institute of Maia
    • Lecture
    • Maximum number of delegates: 18
    This workshop will explore what happens with youth and adult specific crimes and will provide new insights on the Portuguese and European situation of these crimes. A detailed analysis of crime scenes and criminological characteristics of the offender, victim and crime will be carried out. With this workshop, forensic practitioners will be able to discuss different scenarios from different homicide cases and exchange good practices between institutes and countries. Outline of Workshop:
    1. Context of Homicide crimes and context of teen dating violence
    2. Homicide characteristics
    3. Crime scene analysis
    4. Discussion of different homicide scenarios (based on Portuguese data)
    5. Teen dating violence
    6. The Portuguese situation
    7. Statistics nf teen dating violence
    8. Prevention of teen dating violence
    9. Conclusions on differences between teen and adult violence based in these specific crimes
  • 13:00 - 15:00

    Using Forensic Anthropology

    Location: Training Room W1-241, Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Kathy Gruspier (Organizer, Leader), Forensic Anthropologist, OFPS, Renee Kosalka, Forensic Anthropologist, OFPS
    • Practical Demonstration
    • Maximum number of delegates: 15
    • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 09:00 – 12:00
    This workshop will utilize a case-based technique of introducing the delegates to the broader realm of applications of forensic anthropologists in death investigation systems.  Many death investigation systems use forensic anthropology expertise solely for skeletonized remains, if at all.  Often the forensic anthropologist is a fee-for- service person who is not fully integrated into the death investigation system.  Casual use of forensic anthropology benefits neither the forensic anthropologist, nor the system utilizing them. The forensic anthropologist has little chance to gain more experience, and the system relies on individuals who are not experts, which puts the system at risk. Cases will be presented illustrating the positive effects of integrating forensic anthropology in cases such as; human vs non-human, scene investigations, fire scenes, multiple fatalities, positive human identification, historically unidentified remains and others.  Positive effects include minimizing risk of a flawed investigation by using the best expert for the job, as well as cost-savings. This workshop will be of interest to: administrators of death investigation systems, forensic anthropologists, and forensic pathologists.
  • 13:00 - 15:00

    Medicolegal Autopsy Techniques

    Location: Autopsy Teaching Suite (FSCC), Forensic Services and Coroner's Complex, North-West Toronto
    Michael Pollanen (Organizer/Leader), Chief Forensic Pathologist, OFPS, President, International Association of Forensic Sciences
    • Practical Demonstration
    • Maximum number of delegates: 10
    • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 09:00 – 12:00; Monday from 13:00 – 16:00 and Tuesday from 09:00 – 12:00
    • Please note that this workshop is only open to delegates from Low-Middle Income Countries
    At this workshop, delegates will learn how to conduct the basic dissections required in a medicolegal autopsy. The workshop will be conducted in the FSCC autopsy room and take the form of practical instruction. The specific basic techniques that will be taught include: sampling for physical evidence, swabbing, opening the body, evisceration, organ dissection, and bloodless layered dissection of the anterior neck. If time permits, the removal of vertebral arteries will also be demonstrated.

WednesdayAugust 23, 2017

  • 08:30 - 09:30

    IAFS 2017 Opening Ceremony

    Location: Grand Ballroom West & Centre, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 09:30 - 10:15

    Refreshment Break & Poster Viewing

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Ballroom C, E & F, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • Spontaneous Haemothorax in Von Recklinghausen Diseases: A Fatal Case - Dr. Martina Focard. Italy (PS01-257)
    • Autopsic Examination Cases of Acute Esophageal Necrosis: Black Esophagus - Prof. Satoshi Furukawa. Japan (PS01-258)
    • Decrease of Cortical Thickness in Psychopath Offenders - Dr. Ana Agustina. Cuba (PS01-256)
    • QEEG and LORETA in Psychopath Offenders - Dr. Ana Agustina. Cuba (PS01-256)
    • Forensic Studies on Handwriting Written With Unaccustomed Hand - Prof. Prakash Jasuja. India (PS01-136)
    • Testing Methods for the Identification and Analysis of Knife Marks on Bone - Jared Divido. Great Britain (PS01-44)
    • CDC/FBI Joint Criminal-Epidemiological Investigations Workshop Course Evaluations: Data Analysis - Dr. Geroncio Fajardo. US (PS01-75)
    • Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Following a Minor Head Injury: A Rare Cause of Medico-legal Death - Prof Supawon Srettabunjong. Thailand (PS01-109)
    • Fatal Acute Hemorrhagic Bowel Infarction Caused by Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis - Prof. Supawon Srettabunjong. Thailand (PS10-110)
    • Value of Postmortem CT in the Diagnosis of Tension Pneumothorax Due to Acupuncture - Prof Jianhua Zhang. China (PS01-185)
    • Study of Cause of Death and Identification in Exhumed Body - Dr MD Mobin UL Islam. Bangledash (PS01-225)
    • Study of Death by Fire Arm Injury - Dr. MD Mobin Mobin UL Islam. Bangledesh (PS01-237)
    • Knowledge Awareness and Practice Regarding Arsinocosis among the CHCP of Bangladesh - Dr. MD Mobin UL Islam. Bangledesh (PS01-76)
    • Patterns of Homicide in Kuwait: A Retrospective Descriptive Study from 2003-2009 - Prof. Salah Al-Waheeb. Kuwait (PS01-49)
    • Association between SCN5A Gene and Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome in Thai Cadavers - Prof. Supawon Srettabunjong. Thailand (PS01-111)
    • Can Species–Level Oral Bacteriome Compositions Be Used for Human Identification Into Family Units? - Dr. Kingsley Anukam. Canada (PS01-300)
    • When Did He Die? A Tale of Lipid Degradation - Dr. Maiken Ueland. Australia (PS01-43)
    • Analysis of Urdu Handwriting and It's Recognition - Zumrad Bhutta. Pakistan (PS01-164)
    • Colchicine Destroys the Intestinal Barrier Function and Induces Endotoxin Shock - Dr. Hiroki Tanaka. Japan (PS01-112)
    • Forensic Experimental Study of Assessment of Postmortem Interval (0-72 H) in Skin Biopsies - Dr. Guadalupe Melo-Santiesteban. Mexico (PS01-113)
    • Documenting Bloodstains Beneath Paint Layers Using Multi-Spectral Forensic Photography Techniques - Natasha Dilkie. Canada (PS01-259)
    • Comparison Between the Canadian and French Court Ordered Psychiatric Assessment - Dr. Sébastien Prat. Canada (PS01-186)
    • Cardiomyopathies as a Cause of SCD in Egypt; Recognition and Preventive Strategies Needed - Dr. Nora Fawzy. Egypt (PS01-114)
    • Particularities of the Dynamics of Suicide in Romania. Comparative Study for Two Counties - Dr. Bogdan Malinescu. Romania (PS01-115)
    • Inter-professional Collaboration Survey - The Global Network of a Canadian Forensic Specialist - Tobin Tanaka. Canada (PS01-260)
    • Fatal Cardiac Perforation by Leaked PMMA Cement After Percutaneous Vertebroplasty - Dr. Martina Focardi. Italy (PS01-116)
    • Ascending Aortic Rupture Through a Penetrating Atherosclerotic Ulcer: A Rare Cause of Sudden Unexpected Death - Prof. Supawon Srettabunjong. Thailand (PS01-117)
    • An Easy Way to Die. Plant Poisons in Sri Lanka: A Case Report - Prof. Jayantha Herath. Canada (PS01-248)
    • Sudden Unexpected Death of a Young Adult Male Due to Cardiac Hamartoma; A Case Report - Prof. Jayantha Chandrasiri. Canada (PS01-249)
    • Myocardial Bridging of Coronary Arteries: Sudden Unexpected Deaths in a 38–Year–Old Woman - Dr. Ayman Hassan. Egypt (PS01-238)
    • The Relevance of Mathematics in Forensic Science - Prof. Angel Flores Samaniego. Mexico (PS01-77)
    • Classification Trends Among Contemporary Filipino Crania Using Fordisc 3.1 - Matthew Go. US (PS01-12)
    • Estimating Age-at-Death in Bone: Elemental Analysis of the Calcium-to-Phosphorus Ratio - Murray Clayton. Canada (PS01-27)
    • Developing a Method for the Collection and Analysis of Burnt Remains - Katie Nizio. Australia (PS01-261)
    • Accelerometer and Gyroscope Prototype Proposal to Improve Forensics Work in Brazil - Vinícius Lima. Brazil (PS01-262)
    • A Study on the Discrimination of Copy Paper Using Non-destructive Optical Inspection - Dr. Kia Young Lee. Korea (PS01-214)
    • A Time Course Study Demonstrating Multi-RNA Changes to Estimate Postmortem Interval - Yehui Lv. China (PS01-83)
    • Screening, Identification and Functional Analysis of RNA Markers for Early PMI Estimation
    • Screening, Identification and Functional Analysis of RNA Markers for Early PMI Estimation - Yehui Lv. China (PS01-84)
    • Cardio-Vascular Collapse of a Girl Due to Idiopathic Gastric Rupture - Dr. Mehran Fereidooni. Ireland (PS01-01)
    • Police Oversight: Sociological Impacts of the Coroners Inquests - Vincent Eagan. Canada (PS01-263)
    • Using Nutrient Foramina to Discern Human From Nonhuman Long Bone Fragments in Forensic Anthropology - Brigida Corrieri. Great Britain (PS01-13)
    • The Prevalence of Blood Borne Viral Infections Among Autopsy Cases in Jordan - Prof. Imad Al-Abdallat. Jordan (PS01-239)
    • Isolated Intracerebellar Hematoma - Spontaneous or Traumatic? - Assistant Prof. Philip Beh. Hong Kong (PS01-240)
    • Post-Mortem CT Evaluation of Atlanto-Occipital Dissociation - Dr. Mohammed Madadin. Saudi Arabia (PS01-118)
    • Evaluating the Impact of Different Ways of Presenting Trauma Evidence in Court: A Pilot Study - Dr. Soren Blau. Australia (PS01-74)
    • Forensic Medicine Case Report- Tale of a Dead Child - Assoc Prof. Sangeet Kaur. India (PS01-39)
    • Identification of Sperms on Human Skin after Death - Dr. Sanaa Aly. Egypt (PS01-187)
    • Using Handwriting to Infer a Writer's Country of Origin for Forensic Intelligence Purposes - Dr. Marie Morelato. Australia (PS01-165)
    • Development and Implementation of Human Remains Procurement Protocol and Dog Training Program. - Natasha Dilkie. Canada (PS01-264)
    • The Social Determinants Of An Autopsy - The Cutting Edge of Future Impact - Dr. Reuven Jhirad. Canada (PS01-50)
    • Analytical Method Coupled With Multivariate Analysis for Examination of Photocopier/Writing Papers - Raj Kumar. India (PS01-166)
    • Examination of Writing Inks via Analytical Methods and Multivariate Analysis - Asst Prof. Vishal Sharma. India (PS01-215)
    • Gender Differences in Persons With a Mental Disability Who Go Missing - Dr. Stephen Morewitz. US (PS01-40)
    • A Congruent Matching Profile Segments (CMPS) Method for Bullet Signature Correlations - Dr. Wei Chu. US (PS01-265)
    • Two Cases of Non Compact Cardiomyopathy Found at Autopsy in Sri Lanka - Dr. Harshana Senanayake. Sri Lanka (PS01-241)
    • Death During Indigenous Treatments: Chocking With a Half of Lime - Dr. Harshana Senanayake. Sri Lanka (PS01-11)
    • Sexing Juvenile Remains: A Test of Current Methods  - Alexandra Rocca. Canada (PS01-266)
    • The Sources of Contamination in the Forensic Diatom Test - Jian Zhao. China (PS01-250)
    • Psychosocial Assessment Of Juvenile Offenders - Nidhi Hiren. India (PS01-121)
    • Accreditation, Certification as Saviors of Forensic Science? - Prof Frank Crispino. Canada (PS01-301)
    • Forensic Document Examination in International Humanitarian and Human Rights Cases - Tobin Tanaka. Canada (PS01-267)
    • Connecting Forensic Science With Modern Models of Policing - Prof Frank Crispino. Canada (PS01-302)
    • MALDI TOF MS Imaging as a Novel Tool for Estimation of Postmortem Interval in Muscle Tissue - Prof Ping Huang. China (PS01-122)
    • First case of U-47700 at the Southern Minnesota Regional Medical Examiner's Office - Prof. Loralie Langman. US (PS01-268)
    • Third-Generation Airbag Deployment: Injury Patterns in Fatally Injured Drivers - Dr. Michael Shkrum. Canada (PS01-85)
    • Diatom Test Is Still a Reliable Method for the Diagnosis of Drowning - Jian Zhao. China (PS01-188)
    • Organizing a Proficiency Test on Stamp Examination in Accordance With ISO/IEC 17043 Requirements - Dr. Wing-Sze Janesse Hui. Hong Kong (PS01-167)
    • Efficient Wavebands for the Detection of Obliterated Writings by Mid-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging - Dr. Shigeru Sugawara. Japan (PS01-216)
    • Virtual Autopsy: An Essential Tool in Gunshot Wounds, Even Not Immediately Lethal - Dr. Lucile Tuchtan. France (PS01-182)
    • Combined Use of PMCT 3D Reconstruction and 3D-Design Software for Postmortem Ballistic  - Dr. Lucile Tuchtan. France (PS01-183)
    • The Bone Impactor: An Instrumented Device for Simulating Blunt- or Sharp-Force Trauma - Justin Gaudet. Canada (PS01-269)
    • Establishing the First Human Decomposition Facility in Australia - Prof Shari Forbes. Australia (PS01-270)
    • Examination Of The Handwriting Of Identical Twins - Behice Turedi. Turkey (PS01-217)
    • Habits of Writing Heading Based on Education Level in Handwriting Examination - Assoc Prof. N. Canturk. Turkey (PS01-218)
    • A Retrospective Study of Myocardial Bridge Cases Detected in TFMC From 2003 to 2016 - Junchao Zhang. China (PS01-242)
    • Evaluation of the Children for Crimes Against Property - Assoc Prof. N. Canturk. Turkey (PS01-251)
    • The Metabolic Syndrome in a Post Mortem Perspective - A Study of the SURVIVE Cohort - Dr. Martin Christensen. Denmark (PS01-86)
    • Management of Scene of Crime,  A Case Study of Nigeria Settings - Paschal Gbaruko. Nigeria (PS01-73)
    • Bullet Calibre and Type Estimation Based on Ballistic Damage to Sus scrofa (Linnaeus) Long Bone - Bailey Henwood. Canada (PS01-37)
    • Do Resuscitation Attempts of Infants and Children Cause Bruises of the Neck?  - Kimberly Wells. US (PS01-87)
    • Rationalization of B & E Cases Processing: Increased Success Rates in Obtaining Valid DNA Profiles - Veronica Hidalgo-Monroy. Canada (PS01-271)
    • Forensic Aspects of Child Abuse in Egypt - Mohamed Abdelkhalek. Egypt (PS01-06)
    • Case Report: Identification of Two Forged Receipts by Non-Destructive Examination - Dr. Qiran Sun. China (PS01-168)
    • Correlation of Cellular Autolytic Changes in Bone Marrow with Post-mortem Interval = Dr. Shankar Bakkannavar. India (PS01-123)
    • An Unusual Case of Suicide in a Young Amateur Skydiver - Dr. Pierre-Antoine Peyron. France (PS01-124)
    • Applying HPTLC, Raman, SEM  to Detect Grafting of Papers and Estimate Age of the Document - Assoc Prof. Hoang Hung. Vietnam (PS01-78)
    • Coronary Artery Abnormalities as the Cause of Sudden Cardiac Death: A 20 Year Review - Dr. Bernard Pawlowicz. Canada (PS01-88)
    • Enhanced Raman Analysis of Ballpoint Ink Entries by Thin Layer Chromatography - Asst Prof. Yanlin Yu. China (PS01-169)
    • Forensic Human Identification in Syria - Dr. Talaat Al Mouh. Lebanon (PS01-272)
    • Filicide: Clinical and Qualitative Understanding of Parents Who Kill Their Children - Prof. Duarte Nuno Vieira. Portugal (PS01-125)
    • A Minimally-Invasive Internal Gas Reservoir Monitoring Method for Postmortem Examinations - Asst Prof. Katelynn Perrault. US (PS01-273)
    • Copan NUCLEIC-CARD™ Performance With Direct STR Assays - Santina Castriciano. Italy (PS01-51)
    • GC-MS Examination of Different Kinds of Copy Paper - Jinyou Yang. China (PS01-170)
    • Epicardial Fat Association with Other Body Fat Deposits and Coronary Artery Stenosis - Louise Hindso. Denmark (PS01-126)
    • Analysis Of Name Writings & Signatures/Initials Of The Persons And Their Significance - Dr. Vikram Chauhan. India (PS01-219)
    • Strychnine Poisoning: A Rare Case Report - Dr. Joana Batista. Portugal (PS01-189)
    • Elemental Inhomogeneities in Samples of Float Glass and Their Relevance to Forensic Investigations. - Alex Heydon. Canada (PS01-274)
    • The Prevalence of Violence-Inflicted Trauma in a Skeletal Sample From South Africa - Amanda Alblas. South Africa (PS01-02)
    • Suicide by Fatal Pentobarbital Intoxication in Ontario from 2012-2015 - Patricia Solbeck. Canada (PS01-127)
    • Bicuspid Aortic Valve: Sword of Damocles Over the Hearts of Vigorously Training Athletes - Martin Janik. South Korea (PS01-128)
    • Manual 3D Digital Facial Reconstruction: Validating the Procedure - Ivana Šplíchalová. Czech Republic (PS01-19)
    • Forensic Examination of Rubber Stamps - Jatin Sharma. India (PS01-171)
    • Using Drones for 3D On-Site Body Documentation. Experiments Inspired by Real-Life Forensic Cases - Dr. Petra Urbanova. Czech Republic (PS01-52)
    • Hyperspectral Imaging: A Technique for Aging Blowfly Pupae - Prof. Ian Dadour. US (PS01-64)
    • Atypical Non-Ballistic Penetrating Missile Injury in an Industrial Setup: Rare Case Reports - Prof. Yogender Bansal. India (PS01-190)
    • AXUD1 Accelerates Stress-Induced Cardiomyocytes Apoptosis Through Activating Wnt Signaling Pathway - Xing Ye. China (PS01-129)
    • Chronic Allostasis as a Candidate Mediator of Hippocampal Volume Change in Severe Mental Illness - Dr. Johannes Busch. Dnemark (PS01-247)
    • Aggregation-Induced Emission (AIE)-Active Fluorophores for Latent Fingerprint Analysis - Dr. Jin Xiaodong. China (PS01-53)
    • Evaluation and Implementation of the RapidHIT™ Instrument for Rapid Human DNA Identification - Heather Shacker. Canada (PS01-275)
    • Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Due to Dissection of PICA - Dr. Noel McAuliffe. Canada (PS01-191)
    • Sudden Infant Death of Monozygotic  Twin on the Same Day: A Case Report - Asst Prof. Rayyan Ali. Palestine (PS01-192)
    • Study on Myocardium of Sudden Traumatic Deaths to Suggest Diagnostic Criteria for Myocarditis - Dr. Indira Kitulwatte. Sri Lanka (PS01-90)
    • Race Differentiation in the Human Pelvic Girdle for the Application of Expert Witness Testimony - Laura Yurka. US (PS01-38)
    • Anomalous Origin of Left Main Coronary Artery From Pulmonary Artery - Asst Prof. Rayyan Ali. Palestine (PS01-193)
    • Demonic Possession & Exorcism: Investigative and Autopsy Findings in 3 Deaths From Canada - Dr. Andrew Williams. Canada (PS01-91)
    • The Use of Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Screening and Confirmation of Drugs of Abuse Testing - Dr. Bassam Nassar. Canada (PS01-276)
    • Comparison of Traumatic and Natural Disease of the Intestinal Tract in the Pediatric Population - Dr. Rebekah Jacques. Canada (PS01-92)
    • Sex Determination By Discriminant Analysis Of 3D CT Measurements Of Foramen Magnum - Dr. Amira Nasr. Egypt (PS01-31)
    • Cadaver Dog Detection (UK); The Past, Present and Future - Jonathon Brooks. Great Britain (PS01-45)
    • The Impact of One-Step Luminescent Cyanoacrylates on Subsequent DNA Analysis - Alicia Khuu. Australia (PS01-54)
    • Unravelling the Mysteries Behind Sudden Death - Assoc Prof. Subitha K. India (PS01-194)
    • Driving Under Influence of Psychoactive Substances-Related Casualties in Taiwan (2003-2015) - Hsiao-Ting Chen. Taiwan (PS01-70)
    • The Characteristics of Human Trafficking Cases and the Investigation Strategies - Dr Wenchen Wang. China (PS01-277)
    • Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease Using Targeted PMCT Coronary Angiography - Dr. Wan Lei. China (PS01-252)
    • MiR-19b Inhibits GJA1 and Synergizes miR-1 in VMC - Junyi Lin. China (PS01-195)
    • Correlation of Postmortem LODOX Radiological Images and Lung Pathology: A Prospective Autopsy Study - Dr. Karisha Quarrie. South Africa (PS01-255)
    • Determining the Presence of Spermatozoa From Male DNA Fractionation During Differential Extraction - Gerry Alderson. Canada (PS01-278)
    • Application of ESDA in Determination of Tampering - Nadeem-Ul-Hassan Khan. Pakistan (PS01-172)
    • The Contribution of Forensic Pathology in the Treatment of Caustic Ingestion - Asst Prof. Hadjazi Omar. Algeria (PS01-253)
    • The RIP Bullet: Presentation of Cases and Discussion of This New Novel Ammunition - Dr. Kendall Crowns. US (PS01-130)
    • Proposals Death Certification - Asst Prof. Hadjazi Omar. Algeria (PS01-254)
    • Forgery of Illegible Signatures  - Dr. Jassy Anand. India (PS01-220)
    • Detecting 1,4-Butanediol in Beverages - Prof. Zhaohua Dai. US (PS01-46)
    • Metric Pair-Matching of Calcanei in Commingled Remains Cases - Kayla Orr. Canada (PS01-20)
    • A Review of Empirical Methods in Forensic Pathology - Tian Nie. Canada (PS01-03)
    • The Disposition of John and Jane Doe in a Small Maritime Jurisdiction - Dr. Ken Obenson. Canada (PS01-131)
    • Determination of the Age of Iron Based Ink: A Feasability Study - Dr. Albert Lyter. US (PS01-173)
    • The STR DECoDE Panel: Enhanced STR Mixture De-Convolution Using Massively Parallel Sequencing - Nicole Novroski. US (PS01-279)
    • Challenges in Identification of Exhumed Skeletonised Human Remains of a Child: A Case Report - Remilekun Oluwakuyide. Nigeria (PS01-132)
    • A Custom-Designed Membrane Filter for Enriching Diatoms in Forensic Diatom Test - Jian Zhao. China (PS01-133)
    • Road Traffic Fatalities in Children Younger Than 14 Years in Pretoria, 2005-2014. - Dr. Lorraine du Toit-Prinsloo. Australia (PS01-93)
    • How Soil Clay Can Help to Solve Crimes: New Perspectives From Routine Analyses - Dr. Rodrigo Corrêa. Brazil (PS01-134)
    • Procedure Related Deaths at the Pretoria Medico-Legal Laboratory - Dr. Lorraine du Toit-Prinsloo. Australia (PS01-94)
    • Fatal Inhalation of Toxic Fumes Related to Decaying Fish: A Report of Six Deaths - Dr. Khairul Zainun. Malaysia (PS01-135)
    • Modern Possibilities of Using the Data Obtained During Forensic Examination - Inna Chizhikova. Russia (PS01-196)
    • An Investigation of Taphonomic Changes and Decomposition Rates of Frozen Remains: A Porcine Model - Stephanie Baker. Australia (PS01-21)
    • Assessing Sexual Dimorphism in a South African Population - Amanda Alblas. South Africa (PS01-22)
    • Asphyxia or Ethanol-Intoxication? A Forensic Pathological and Toxicological Case Report - Dr. Sizhe Huang. China (PS01-226)
    • Sexual Homicide: An Unusual Case of Mechanical Asphyxia by Three Different Methods - Assoc Prof. Jozef Krajčovič. Slovakia (PS01-09)
    • Automatic Classification of Epiphysis in the First Metacarpal with Support Vector Machine - Yahui Wang. China (PS01-227)
    • The Estimation of the Postmortem Interval: A Physicochemical Model - Prof. José Ignacio Muñoz-Barús. Spain (PS01-136)
    • Fatal Anaphylaxis as an Unusual Presentation of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst: An Autopsy Case - Prof. Samir Maatoug. Tunisia (PS01-197)
    • When You Seed Violence You Harvest Violence- Adolescent Parricide. Case Presentation - Prof. Beatrice Loan. Romania (PS01-228)
    • Sudden Death Due to Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy:a Study of 40 Autopsy Cases - Prof. Hongmei Dong. China (PS01-95)
    • Assessment of Heart Weight and Heart Weight/Body Parameters Coefficient in Southern Iranian Adults - Dr. Mohammad Zarenezhad. Iran (PS01-224)
    • A Comparison of Suicide by Self-Immolation Before and After Revolution of January 2011 - Prof. Samir Maatoug. Tunisia (PS01-229)
    • Sociodemographic and Clinical Profile in Elderly Suicide Victims: 34 Autopsy Case Studies - Prof. Samir Maatoug. Tunisia (PS01-230)
    • Traumatic Rupture of MCA Followed by SAH: Tailored Approach With Post-Mortem Angiographic Findings - Dr. Sohyung Park. Korea (PS01-137)
    • Burning the Infant Because of Postpartum Psychosis; A Case Report and Review of Literature - Saeid Gholamzadeh. Iran (PS01-07)
    • Geocaching: A Rare Cause of Accidental Hanging - Assoc Prof. Ľubomír Straka. Slovakia (PS01-198)
    • Clothing and Bedding From Sexual Assaults Cases: Is DNA Analysis Still Relevant After Laundering? - Magali Loyer. Canada (PS01-280)
    • Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis in Schizophrenic Patients With Violence. Prof. Qinting Zhang. China (PS01-138)
    • Rare Autopsy Findings in Bodies Buried Beneath a Mountain of Dump. Ahmad Shojaei. Iran (PS01-184)
    • Epidemiological and Forensic Study of Criminal Deaths in the South of Tunisia - Prof. Samir Maatoug. Tunisia (PS01-69)
    • Forensic Services in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia - Dr. Mohammed Alshaikhi. South Africa. (PS01-62)
    • P300 Reflecting Impairment of Daily Activities in Mental Disorders Due to Traumatic Brain Injury - Dr. Haozhe Li. China (PS01-231)
    • Medicolegal Management of Unidentified Bodies; A Comparative Study from Three Provinces in Sri Lanka - Prof. Anuruddhi Edirisinghe. Sri Lanka (PS01-232)
    • Forensic Science & Human Migration: The Role of Social Media - Emma Johnston. Great Britain (PS01-47)
    • An Assessment of Different Methods of GSR Deposition on Clothing and Hands in a Firing Range - Dr. Elspeth Lindsay. Canada (PS01-281)
    • To Study Soil Color Beneath the Buried Carcass of Pig as Evidence for Forensic Science - Dr. Sarabijit Singh. India (PS01-2828)
    • Post-Mortem CT for Forensic Applications: A Systematic Review of Gunshot Deaths - Dr. GIovanni Paliani. Italy (PS01-96)
    • Violence Against Women, Medico-social Study (2015-2016) CHU Setif-Algeria - Prof. Saadia Benkobbi. Algeria (PS01-283)
    • Road Traffic Accident or Crime - Prof. Abdellatif Boublenza. Algeria (PS01-243)
    • Aggregation and Competition in Lucilia Sericata and Phormia Regina Meigen (Diptera:Calliphoridae) - Patricia Okpara. Canada (PS01-65)
    • The Use of Formaldehyde Imbedded Human Remains in Experimental Procedures - Hanna Friedlander. Canada (PS01-244)
    • Skeletal Reduction and Death Date in a Coastal Environment for the Purpose of a Case - Laura Villavicencio. Ecuador (PS01-199)
    • Aorto-Oesophageal Fistula: A Rare Cause for Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding - Dr. Sanjaya Hulathduwa. Sri Lanka (PS01-139)
    • Relationship Between Fracture Type and Force on Mammalian Juvenile Ribs (Sus scrofa, Linneaus) - Katie Boyd. Canada (PS01-32)
    • Extreme Violence Against Children and Elderly  Women: Interprofessional Collaboration for Justice - Dr. Bogdan Malinescu. Romania (PS01-10)
    • Diagnostic Labels and Multiple-Pathology - Dr. Sanjaya Hulathduwa. Sri Lanka (PS01-140)
    • Rapid DNA Identification of Human Remains: A New Path Forward for the Medico-legal Community - Dr. Amanda Sozer. US (PS01-63)
    • Injury-Related Deaths in Enugu, Nigeria From 2010 to 2016: A Descriptive Review - Dr. Smauel Ohayi. Nigeria (PS01-200)
    • Investigation into the Effect of Hand Sanitizers on Latent Fingermarks - Dr. Scott Chadick. Australia (PS01-55)
    • Assessing the Use of DNA Expert Evidence, by Justice System Participants, in Ontario Criminal Courts - Dawn Cohen. Canada (PS01-284)
    • Child Suicide in the Outskirts of Maputo - Asst PRof. Dennisse Reves. Mozambique (PS01-233)
    • The Parameters of Eye-Track in Patients With Mental Disorder Due to Brain Damage - Chao Liu. China (PS01-245)
    • Concentration of Hypoxanthine in Korean Vitreous Humor for the Estimation of Postmortem Interval - Ahra Go. Korea (PS01-141)
    • 'Microanthropology': A Multidisciplinary Approach for Estimating PMI in an Australian Climate - Dr. Hayley Green. Australia (PS01-23)
    • Survey of Bacterial Diversity Associated with Various Life Stages of Lucilia sericata in Virginia - Denise Wohlfahrt. US (PS01-142)
    • An Indel Polymorphism within RYR2 Modulates Sudden Unexplained Death Risk in Chinese Populations - Prof. Yuzhen Gao. China (PS01-143)
    • Chemical Enhancement of 2D Bloodied Footwear Impressions on a Tile Substrate - Edman Abukar. Canada (PS01-285)
    • Sexual Dimorphism in the Juvenile Cranium: A Preliminary Study of a Western Australian Population. Jacqueline Noble. Australia (PS01-24)
    • Three-Dimensional Facial Reconstruction Based on Soft Tissue Thickness From Head CT Scan Images - Dr. Kauhiko Imaizumi. Japan (PS01-25)
    • A Survey on Prevalence of Domestic Violence Against Women in Iran - Dr. Maryam Farajian Paymafard. Iran (PS01-71)
    • The Role of Forensic Pathologist in Mass Disaster - Dr. Maryam Farajian Paymafard. Iran (PS01-144)
    • Discrimination of Laser Printer Toners Using Attenuated Total Reflectance-FTIR With Chemometrics - Neha Verma. India (PS001-286)
    • An Assessment of Raman Spectroscopy for Postmortem Interval Estimation From Skeletonised Remains - Madelen Chikhani. Australia (PS01-14)
    • Deaths Due to Suicide in Puttalam, Sri Lanka: An Autopsy Study - Sriyantha Amararatne. Sri Lanka (PS01-145)
    • Fatal Intoxications: Do Subjects With Cardiac Pathologies Die at Lower Concentrations of Drugs? - Dr. Kanar Alkass. Sweden (PS01-97)
    • Three Gunshots and One Trajectory - Case Report of a Multiple Gunshot Suicide - Prof. Duarte Nuno Vieira. Portugal (PS01-146)
    • Applying 3D Human Body Shape in Forensic Identification Tasks - Dominik Černý. Czech Republic (PS01-234)
    • Mistakes in a Forensic Mortuary - Why Scientists Should Know What Happens in Their Local Mortuary - Dr. Jodie Leditschke. Australia (PS01-80)
    • Death of an Infant During a Circumcision Surgery: Is It Criminal Medical Negligence? - Dr. Sriyantha Amararatne. Sri Lanka (PS01-201)
    • Death During a Plastic Surgery: Is It Civil Medical Negligence? Dr. Sriyantha Amararatne. Sri Lanka (PS01-202)
    • Skull Variation Among Brazilian and Scottish Populations - Assoc. Prof. Maria Gabriela Biazevic. Brazil (PS01-04)
    • Stature Estimation from Hand Length: Attempt to Population-nonspecific Method - Czech Republic (PS01-33)
    • Expression Profiles of Plasma MiRNAs in Patients with Mild to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury - Prof. Yongliang Zhang. China (PS01-147)
    • Forensic Autopsy of Decedents in Sleeping Accommodations in Munich, Germany Between 2011 and 2015 - Dr. Michael Schwerer. Denmark (PS01-148)
    • Testing the Reproducibility of 3D Models of Long Bones: MDCT Versus 3D Surface Scanning - Lorenzo Campana. Switerland (PS01-34)
    • External-Cause Mortality in Young People Aged 10-24 Years During 1998-2016 in Epirus, Greece - Prof. Theodore Vougiouklakis. Germany. (PS01-149)
    • Lethal Acetaminophen Poisoning: Medico-Legal Implications - Assoc. Prof. Abir Aissaoui. Tunisia (PS01-05)
    • Estimation of Chronological Age Based on the Dental Development of the Third Mandibular Molars - Prof Clotilde Rougé-Maillart. France (PS01-35)
    • Sexual Dimorphism in Maxillary and Frontal Sinuses Using Multidetector Computed Tomography - Dr. Mahrous Ibrahim. Egypt (PS01-15)
    • Fatal Bronchovascular Fistula Visualized through Postmortem Computed Tomography Angiography - Dr. Philipp Hinderberger. Switzerland (PS01-203)
    • Cervical Injuries in Drowning Cases - Assoc Prof. Abir Aissaoui. Tunisia (PS01-246)
    • Hierarchical Top-Down Examination of Cranial Gunshot Injuries - Veronika Kováčová. Czech Republic. (PS01-36)
    • Role of MPMCTA in the Congruence of Cardiovascular Measurements: Autopsy and Post-Mortem Imaging - Kewin Ducrot. Swittzerland (PS01-98)
    • Environmental Crimes in Brazilian Federal District: An Analysis From 2009 to 2015 - Renata Ribeiro. Brazil (PS01-72)
    • Immunohistochemical Localization of Langerhans Cells as a Tool of Vitality in Hanging Mark Wounds 0 Dr Martina Focardi. Italy (PS01-204)
    • Forensic Service in the Middle East- Challenges - Prof Mohamed Elfawal. Kuwait (PS01-56)
    • The Contribution of Forensic Anthropology in Burnt Human Remains: A Case Report - Dr. Katiuscia Bisogni. Italy (PS01-16)
    • Comparing Fist Size to Heart Size Is Not a Viable Technique to Assess Cardiomegaly - Dr. Lars Ebert. Switzerland (PS01-150)
    • CircRNAs May Serve as Optimum Biomarkers in Forensic Research - Yehui Lv. China (PS01-99)
    • Findings in Post-Mortem Computer Tomography and Autopsy in a Fatal Case of Stomach Ache - Christoph Anders. Switzerland (PS01-205)
    • Defining Exposure Time Using Burn Severity of Skin Tissue Under the Scanning Electron Microscope - Dr. Shashi Jasra. Canada (PS01-206)
    • Fatal Accidents With Pedestrian Victims: PMCT and Autopsy Correlation - Vasiliki Chatzaraki. S witerland (PS01-151)
    • Ageing Changes in the Face and the Cardiovascular System - Meryem Ebedi. United Kingdom (PS01-100)
    • Problem Wildlife: Using DNA to Identify Perpetrators in Animal Attacks - Lindsey Monderman. Canada (PS01-287)
    • Family Physicians' Knowledge About Child Abuse Risk Factors and Attitudes for Legal Reporting - Asst Prof. Sinem Yildiz Inanici. Turkey (PS01-57)
    • Case Report: Sudden Death by Aortic Aneurysm Rupture Into the Esophagus - Dr. Silvia de Andrade. Portugal (PS01-207)
    • Visualization Strategies Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy- Recommendations Based on Semiotic Analysis - Dr. Wolf Schweitzer. Switzerland (PS01-152)
    • Very Affordable Immersion Pump for Post Mortem CT Angiography in Forensic Pathology: First 10 Cases. - Dr. Wolf Schweitzer. Switzerland (PS01-153)
    • A New Dimension in Fire Debris Analysis: Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Absorption Spectroscopy - Paul Johnson. US (PS01-101)
    • Difficulties in Proving by Autopsy the Cause of Death by Insect Order of Hymenoptera Sting - Dr. Bogdan Malinescu. Romania (PS01-208)
    • Retrospective Analysis of Post-Mortem Microbiology Cultures in Children Under Five Years of Age - Aysha Draves. Canada (PS01-102))
    • Undetermined Manner of Death: What's Missing? a 10-Year Study of Forensic Autopsies in Lisbon - Dr. Ana Abreu. Portugal (PS01-154)
    • Transfer and Persistence of DNA as a Result of Skin-to-Skin Fondling/Grabbing - Melissa Kell. Canada (PS01-288)
    • Electrophysiological Response of Phormia Regina to Cadaveric Pig Volatile Organic Compounds - Julie Ly. Canada (PS01-289)
    • Psychological Assessment for Asylum Seekers in France -Dr. Geoerge Patru. France (PS01-155)
    • Benzodiazepine Effect in a Handwriting Analysis Case - Narumi Lima. Brazil (PS01-221)
    • Suicide in the Aboriginal Population in Ontario, Canada - Dr. Kona Williams. Canada (PS01-103)
    • Indentation Recovery Threshold using the Electrostatic Detection Apparatus ® - Dr. James Turner. United Kingdom (PS01-222)
    • Review of Shellfish Illnesses and Deaths in Mississippi - Dr. Mark LeVaughn. US (PS01-104)
    • Aortic Stenosis in a Man With Multiple Sclerosis Involving the Brain Stem - Dr. Natasha Richards. Canada (PS01-156)
    • How Well Do People Know Their Signatures? - Dr. James Turner. United Kingdom (PS01-174)
    • Severe, Unilateral Retinal Hemorrhage Implicates Trauma per Se as the Limiting Pathogenic Factor - Arushi Tripathy. US (PS01-105)
    • Is It Possible to Postpone Postmortem Diagnostic of Ketoacidotic States and Obtain Reliable Results? - Dr. Eduard Kralj . Sierra Leone (PS01-106)
    • Handwriting Examination in a Case of Twin Brothers 0 Narumi Lima. Brazil (PS01-175)
    • A Case of Aortic Dissection with Novel Genetic Mutation - Dr. Trudy-Ann Brown. (Canada (PS01-176)
    • Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy - a Case Report at Literature Review - Dr George Patru. France (PS01-235)
    • Stab Wound Suicide, Difficulties Establishing the Manner of Death - A Case Report - Dr. Joana Azevedo. Portugal (PS01-209)
    • Fatal Angle Grinder - A Case Study - Dr. Joana Azevedo. Portugal (PS01-157)
    • Accidental or Fatal Child Maltreatment? - Dr. Luis Ravanal. Chile (PS01-08)
    • Decapitation in Hanging - Dr. Jung Sik Jang. Korea (PS01-158)
    • Statistical Comparison of the Efficacy of US State DNA Databases - Prof. Oluseyi Vanderpuye. US (PS01-58)
    • Suicide Mortality in the Brazilian Federal District: Analysis of Police Data 2005-2014 - Georgiana Gomes. Brazil (PS01-159)
    • Y chromosome and mtDNA Diversity in a French-Canadian Population and Lessons for Forensic Genetics - Alexandra Doyon. Canada (PS01-290)
    • Analysis of Abnormal CT Scans Using Virtual Autopsy Software ‘Invivo5.4’ by Anatomage - Dr. Shashi. Jasra. Canada (PS01-210)
    • Juvenile Death and Fire: A Preliminary Look at Cremation Processes in Juvenile Remains - Kayleigh Watson. Canada (PS01-291)
    • Discrimination of Multipurpose Papers by Paper Brightness - Yiwen Luo. China (PS01-177(
    • Reliability of N-Propyl Alcohol Measured in Decayed Muscle - Dr. Jung Sik Jang. Korea (PS01-211)
    • Canadian Judicial Gatekeeping of Forensic Evidence: A Qualitative Case Analysis and Critique. Vienna Lam. Canada (PS01-292)
    • Anthropological Knowledge in Forensic Death Investigations of Unknown Skeletons: Indian Scenario  - Asst Prof. J. Sehrawat. India (PS01-293)
    • Lacustrine Taphonomy: A Histotaphonomic Analysis of Submerged Skeletal Remains - Vienna Lam. Canada (PS01-294)
    • Stable Isotope Analysis as Fingerprints of Life-History of Human Remains Excavated From a Well - Dr. J. Sehrawat. India (PS01-295)
    •  Hemoglobin A1c Level as Point-of-Care Testing in Postmortem Diagnosis - Joo-Young Na. Korea (PS01160)
    • Delayed Death Due to Aortic Rupture After Chest Blunt Trauma: An Autopsy Report - Jong-Tae Park. Korea (PS01-161)
    • Forensic Anthropological Importance of Morphometric Variability in Human Clavicle Features - Asst Prof. J. Sehrawat. India (PS01-296)
    • Reliability of Arm Span as a Predictor of Stature: An Aid in Forensic Investigation - Sonam Chadgal. India (PS01-236)
    • Evaluation of Electric Shock Fatality Case Autopsies in Istanbul Between 2008-2014 -Dr. Erdem Okdemir. Turkey (PS01-212)
    • Predictive Role of Radiographically Determined Metatarsal Length in Stature Estimation in Egyptians - Dr. Mahrous Ibrahim. Egypt (PS01-28)
    • A Burnt Body and Vena Caval Liquid Fat - Dr, Ken Obenson. Canada (PS01-162)
    • Analysis of Postmortem Changes in Internal Organs and Gases Using Computed Tomography Data - Dr. Miki Okumura. Japan (PS01-213)
    • Comparison of Anthropological, Chemical and Molecular Identification of Human Skeletal Remains  - Asst Prof. J. Sehrawat. India (PS01-297)
    • Socio-Demographic Analysis of Southern Sri Lanka Through Autopsy Data of Three Decades - Dr. Clifford Perera. Sri Lanka (PS01-107)
    • Biomechanics and Composition of Buried Juvenile Pig Ribs in Relation to the Postmortem Interval - Luisa Marinho. Canada (PS01-29)
    • Determination of Pen Ink Resins by Thermal Desorption and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry - Dr. Kadir Dastan. Turkey (PS01-223)
    • Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol in Motorcycle Fatalities - Asst Prof. Mariji Bakovic. Croatia (PS01-59)
    • The Growth and Development of Lucillia and Calliphora Sp. In the Presence of a Range of Drugs - Dr. Suzzanne McColl. United Kingdom (PS01-66)
    • Sexual Dimorphism in Human Hip Bone From the Perspective of 3D Surface Based Techniques - Marek Daňko. Czech Republic (PS01-30)
    • Addressing Challenges in Regulated and Validated Workflow Using Converge™ Software - Makesh Kumar Karpagavinaaygam. US (PS01-60)
    • The Nigeria Coroners' Laws: Evolution and Challenges - Prof. John Obafunwa. Nigeria (PS01-48)
    • The Effects of Hydrochloric Acid on Fleshed Porcine Ribs - Amaretta Azevedo. US (PS01-17)
    • The Precision of Virtual Pelvises Derived From Clinical CT-Images for Forensic Anthropology - Kerrie Colman. Netherlands (PS01-18)
    • Estimation of Time Since Death Using a Body Cooling Models of Pigs Dr. Dae-Kyoon Park. Korea (PS01-61)
    • Survivor of Physical Child Abuse and a Tale of Child Neglect: Case Series Study - Prof. Maha Ghanem. Egypt (PS01-82)
    • Grateful for Your Service: A Proposal to Better Coordinate Military Death Investigations - Laurel Clegg. Tunisia (PS01-298)
    • Answering the Families: Antemortem Data Collection for Missing Migrants in West Africa - Laurel Clegg. Tunisia (PS01-299)
    • Inquest and Public Safety – Recommendations for Culture Change - Dr. Louise McNaughton-Filion. Canada (PS01-41)
    • Is an Inquest the Only Tool in the Toolbox? - Dr. Louise McNaughton-Filion. Canada (PS01-42)
    • The Analysis of Ballpoint Inks With APCI-MS After Fading With Light, Peroxide and Bleach - Dr. Claire Williamson. United Kingdom (PS-180)
    • Reforming the Century Old Laws Relating to Investigation of Death (Coroner System) in Sri Lanka - Prof. Ravindra Fernando. Sri Lanka. (PS01-67)
    • Male or Female Tissue? Detection of the Inactivated X-Chromosome by H3K27me3 Immunohistochemistry - Dr. Joelle Tschui. China (PS01-178)
    • Diaphragmatic Hernias Presenting as Sudden Death: 2 Case Reports. - Dr. Charmaine Van Wyk. South Africa (PS01-179)
    • The Study of Electroencephalogram in Assessment of Mild Psychiatry Impairment - Prof. Wei Guan. China (PS01-181)
    • Suicide in Pretoria: A Retrospective Review for the Period 2007 – 2010 - Dr. Ryan Blumenthal. South Africa (PS01-68)
    • Forensic Pathology in Trinidad and Tobago - Dennecia George. Trinidad and Tobago (PS01-81)
    • The Relative Location of the Mental Foramen as a Determinant of Sex in Mandibles from Jamaicans - Dr. Landi Peart. Jamaica (PS01-89)
    • The Making of a Human Taphonomy Facility in Amsterdam, the Netherlands - Prof Roelof-Jan Oostra. Netherlands (PS01-79)
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Plenary Lecture: Hong Kong Foundation Lecture - Forensic Issues in Human Migration

    Location: Grand Ballroom West & Centre, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • 10:15 - 10:45 Professor Lori E. BAKER, Baylor University, USA
    • 10:45 - 11:15 Professor Randall HANSEN, University of Toronto, Canada
    • 11:15 - 11:45 Professor José Antonio LORENTE, University of Granada, Spain
  • 12:00 - 13:30

    Lunch Break & Poster Viewing

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Ballroom C, E & F, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 14:30

    The IAFS 2017 G. Raymond Chang Award & Lecture

    Location: Grand Ballroom West & Centre, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 15:15

    Invited Speaker Session: Terrorism and Armed Conflict

    Location: Grand Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • 1:45 - 2:15 Mass Fatality Management Response to the Complex Coordinated Attack - Dr. Roger A. MITCHELL, JR., Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, District of Columbia, USA
    • 2:15 - 2:45 Professor Jay D. ARONSON, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
    • 2:45 - 3:15 Professor Sarathchandra KODIKARA, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
  • 13:45 - 17:30

    Canadian Society of Forensic Science (CSFS)

    Location: Sheraton Hall A, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 15:15

    Oral Session: Forensic Pathology

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 15:15

    Oral Session: Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences

    Location: Sheraton Hall B, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 15:15

    Oral Session: Criminalistics

    Location: Chestnut East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 15:15 - 16:00

    Poster Viewing Session

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Ballroom C, E & F, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 16:00 - 17:30

    Oral Session: Anthropology

    Location: Grand Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 16:00 - 17:30

    Oral Session: Biology

    Location: Grand Ballroom West & Centre, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 16:00 - 17:30

    Oral Session: New Forensic Technologies, Digital Evidence and Cybercrime

    Location: Sheraton Hall B, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • Professor Zeno GERADTS, Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI), The Netherlands
  • 16:00 - 17:30

    Oral Session: General

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 16:00 - 17:30

    Oral Session: Questioned Documents

    Location: Chestnut East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada

ThursdayAugust 24, 2017

  • 08:00 - 09:30

    HHRRC Lecture: International Perspectives - Working In Challenging Environments

    Location: Grand Ballroom West & Centre, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • Mr. Yves DACCORD, ICRC Director-General, Geneva
    • Dr. Maria Corazon A. DE UNGRIA, University of the Philippines
    • Dr. Duarte Nuno VIEIRA, University of Coimbra, Portugal
  • 09:30 - 10:15

    Refreshment Break & Poster Viewing

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom West, Sheraton Ballroom C, E & F, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • Role of Forensic Medical Service in Development of Public Health System -Prof. Vugar Mammadov. Azerbaijan (PS02-170)
    • Determination of Type of Firearm When Only 12G Shotshell Cases are Submitted in Laboratory  - Aurangzaib Ahmad. Pakistan (PS02-179)
    • The Evaluation of Fibre Evidence – the Fallacy of Frequency? - Dr. Ray Palmer. United Kingdom (PS02-45)
    • A Retrospective Study of Road traffic Accident (R.T.A) 0n the High Way at Bogra district. - Dr. MD Mobin UL Islam. Bangladesh (PS02-200)
    • Individual Characteristics Within Firing Pin Impression of of 7.62x39 Caliber Rifle - Aurangzaib Ahmad. Pakistan (PS02-178)
    • Importance of Fibers to Crime Reconstruction and Investigation - Dr. Catia Pontedeira. Portugal (PS02-157)
    • A Case Study of Extracting Blood Palmprint by Using Blood Auto Autofluorescence - Zhong Ke. China (PS02-153)
    • Persistence of Sperm: What the Literature Really Says - Mr. James Difrancesco. US (PS02-56)
    • Research on Application of Traces Test in Technical Appraisal of Road Traffic Accident - Prof. Lily Li. China (PS02-180)
    • New Developing Reagent for Latent Fingermark Visualization: Fuller's Earth (Multani Mitti) - Pallavi Thakur. India (PS02-93)
    • Visualization of Obliterated Serial Numbers Using Magnetic Particle Testing - Kazuhito Hibino. Japan (PS02-171)
    • Morphometric Characterization of the Superior Lateral Incisor for Sex Determination - Dr. Patricia Denis-Rodriguez. Mexico (PS02-165)
    • Impact of Automated Methods Applied to DNA Profiling Workflow Management. Dr. Kevin Miller. US (PS02-46)
    • NMR Analysis and Qualitative Confirmation of Illicit Drugs in Mixtures. Mr. Travis Broenske. US (PS02-12)
    • We Solve Crime with a Little Help from Our Friends - Rachel Oefelein. US (PS02-94)
    • Morphometrics, Craniofacial Disease Genes, and the Quest for the Genetic Basis of Facial Morphology - Bailey Harrington. US (PS02-181)
    • Directions of Forensic Science Researches in the Republic of Belarus - Assoc Prof. Andrei Tsiatsiuyeu. Belarus (PS02-172)
    • Single Metal Deposition vs Physical Developer, a Comparison of Two Fingermark Detection Techniques - Dr. Sebastien Moret. Australia (PS02-17)
    • Wildfires of Electrical Origin, Deaths and Litigation - Prof. Helmut Brosz. Canada (PS02-131)
    • Developmental Validation of a New 6-Dye STR 25-Plex for Casework and Database Samples - Dr. Xue Bai. China (PS02-185)
    • Evaluation of DNA from Blood Treated With Various Cleaning Agents - Hubert Small. Jamaica (PS02-58)
    • Development of Forensic Medicine and Forensic Sciences in Arab Region - Prof. Dina Shokry. Egypt (PS02-220)
    • The Detection of Exogenous Drug in Fingerprints After Development With Powders and Adhesive Lifters - Ting Zhang. China (PS02-108)
    • Investigation of Different Swab Types for Collection of Biological Sample from Various Fabrics. - Blaine Butler. US (PS02-34)
    • Killings by the Police in Finland 2000-2016 - Dr. Ursula Vala. Finland (PS02-210)
    • Interpretation of Transfer Traces at the Activity Level : Glass Evidence - Etienne Petit. Canada (PS02-32)
    • Detection of a Specific Genetic Marker (LCE1D) on Different Surfaces After Variable Time Intervals - Prof. Nadia Kotb. Egypt (PS02-132)
    • Identification of PDMS in Antifoaming Agent Using HS-SPME-GC/MS and Its Effects Therefore - Dr. Min-Hui Son. Korea (PS02-158)
    • Skills and Abilities for Serious Crimes Investigations: Turkey Example - Asst Prof. Burak Gonultas. Turkey (PS02-211)
    • Establishment and Application of the PCR Capillary Electrophoresis System for Diagnosis of Drowning - Dr. Quyi Xu. China (PS02-59)
    • Cases Similarities: The Crux for Fire Investigation Support and Knowledge Sustainability - EmmanuelleEme. Switzerland (PS02-59)
    • Evaluation and Optimization of DNA Recovery and Amplification from Bullet Cartridge Cases - Heather Milnthorp. US (PS02-60)
    • Preliminary Study of Laminated Glasses Based on Nanocellulose and PVB for Safety Glazing - Chloé Maury. Canada )PS02-133)
    • Fingerprint Analysis: Chemical Recognition of Amino Acids for Identifying Originator Attributes - Erica Brunelle. US (PS02-98)
    • Using Bioaffinity-based Cascades for the Discernment of Biological Sex from Fingerprint Samples Crystal Huynh. US (PS02-52)
    • An Outlook of the Forensic Entomology in Colombia Contributions from Tecnológico de Antioquia - Luz Gomez. Colombia (PS02-186)
    • UV-Vis-NIR Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis for Forensic Examination of Textile Fibers - Asst Prof. Vishal Sharma. India (PS02-159)
    • Restoration of Lead Filled Chassis Number of Vehicles Preferably Used by Terrorist - Muhammad Adnan. Pakdistan (PS02-123)
    • Y Chromosome STR Typing: A Distinguishing Tool For Exclusion in Casework of Sexual Assault - Dr. Suminder Kaur. India (PS02-199)
    • The Chemometric Analysis of Fuel Components to Classify UK Petrol and Diesel Using GC-MS and FTIR - Praew Suppajariyawat. United Kingdom (PS02-29)
    • XRD Analysis of Soil Beneath Rabbit Carcass: An Implication to Forensic Science - Sarabjit Singh. India (PS02-53)
    • An Elephant qPCR Assay for Forensic Purposes - Asst Prof. Jillian Fesolovich/ US (PS02-61)
    • The Use of a Synthetic Oligonucleotide for Creating a Standard Curve for qPCR Assays - Asst Prof. Jillian Fesolovich/ US (PS02-62)
    • A Study of Error in the Estimation of the Origin of a Radial Spatter Pattern - Jordan Deppisch. US (PS02-35)
    • STR Detection Rate According to Collection Time of Sexual Assault Kit (SAK) Against Teenagers - Song Yi Han. Korea (PS02-214)
    • Muscle Protein Degradation in PMI Estimation - Recent Accomplishments and Challenges - Dr. Stefan Pittner. Austria (PS02-36)
    • Development of a Dissolvable Swab for Increased Biospecimen Recovery - Dr. Nikolai Braun. US (PS02-36)
    • Front End DNA Analysis Enhancements: Collection, Recovery, Sample Integrity and Improved Workflow - Nicole Novroski. US (PS02-18)
    • Ethical Dilemmas in Forensic Medical Practice - Dr. Indira Kitulwatte. Sri Lanka (PS002-176)
    • Analysis of Dental Injury Manner in A Case of Domestic Violence: A Case Report -Prof. Xia Wentao. China (PS02-166)
    • Effect of Digital Media on Obtaining Knowledge on Sexual Rights/Offences: A Study From Sri Lanka - Bhagya De Silva. Sri Lanka (PS02-167)
    • D4N6FLOQSwabs™ Allows Repeat Testing of Original Trace Collected From Crime Scene - Santina Castriciano. Italy )PS02-99)
    • A New Calorimetric Identification of Benzodiazepine: Using Cobalt Thiocyanate as Reagent - Zahid Mahmood. Pakistan (PS02-100)
    • Better Practice in Assessing Fingermark Detection Results - Dr. Sebastien Moret. Australia (PS02-19)
    • Forensic Advisors – Role and Usefulness in the Judicial Process in Belgium - Dr. Sonja Bitzer. Belgium (PS02-07)
    • Medicolegal Aspects of Different Forms of Abuse and Violence - Prof. Anil Aggrawal. India (PS02-168)
    • Copan 4N6Devices for Resolving the Mysteries of Crime Scene Investigations - Santina Castriciano. Italy (PS02-101)
    • Unnatural Deaths of Girl Children and Female Youth; A Study from Three Provinces in Sri Lanka - Prof. Anuruddhi Edirisinghe. Sri Lanka (PS02-201)
    • The Analysis of Cutting Agents in Australian Seizures of Cocaine and Heroin Over Six Years - Harmonie Michelot. Australia (PS02-20)
    • Chemometrics Applied to Chemical Profiles of Cocaine Seizures: A Forensic Intelligence Approach - Harmonie Michelot. Australia (PS02-37)
    • Suitcase Concealment: An Analysis of the Taphonomic Processes and Their Effect on PMI Estimation - A. Skylar Joseph. US (PS02-135)
    • Analysis of Water-Based Lubricants by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry/Nanoelectrospray Ionisation - Shiona Hood. Australia (PS02-38)
    • Identification of Female-Specific Blood Stain Using 17β-estradiol Targeted Aptamer-based Sensor - Dr. Joo-Yooung Kim. Korea (PS02-187)
    • New Forensic Science Study at the University of Warsaw - Prof. Tadeusz Tomaszewski. Poland (PS02-115)
    • The Application of Laser Detection Line Trace Traceability System - Dr. Nan Pan. China (PS02-198)
    • A System for Testing and Analyzing Three-dimensional Footprints - Dr. Nan Pan. China (PS02-154)
    • R & D of Chemical Technologies for Discriminative Quantification of Elements in Evidence Samples - Dr. Yasuo Seto. japan (PS02-124)
    • Forensic body fluid identification using proteomics on LC-QTOF - Michael Bissonnette. Canada (PS02-89)
    • Spectrum of Cerebral Pathology as a Function of Survival Time in Abusive Head Trauma - Dr. Rudy Castellani. US (PS02-01)
    • Evaluating The Effectiveness Of Recovery Methods For Gunshot Residue On Vehicle Materials - Claire Rhodes. United Kingdom (PS02-116)
    • Y chromosome and mtDNA Diversity in a French-Canadian Population and Lessons for Forensic Genetics - Alexandra Doyon. Canada (PS02-63)
    • Recent Legal Measures Against Stalking in India - Prof. Anil Aggrawal. India (PS02-215)
    • Investigating the Use of 5-MTN, Genipin and Lawsone to Identify Areas Of "Touch" DNA Deposition - Michelle Tremblay. Canada (PS02-90)
    • Dental Age Estimation in Adults: East-Central Europe Region - Daniel Dvorak. Czech Republic (PS02-16)
    • Age Estimation From Teeth in North Western Adult Indians: A Histological and Ultrastructural Study - Dr. Jasbir Arora. India (PS02-64)
    • Microscopy of Traces on Tape Lifts With High Optical Resolution - Dr. Jaap Weerd. Netherlands (PS02-47)
    • Complementary Strategies in DNA Identification of Specific Cases of Mina Disaster Victims - Assoc Prof. Ahmad Shojaei. Ireland (PS02-117)
    • Surveillance and Epidemiological Study of Illicit Drug-Related Fatalities in Taiwan (2001-2015)- Dr. Kai-Ping Shaw. Taiwan (PS02-160)
    • Focus Variation With Integrated Form Removal for Forensic Comparison of Bullet Striations - Dr. Karl Walton. United Kingdom (PS02-65)
    • Infrared Photography - An Auxiliary Tool in Bloodstain Pattern Analysis - Dr. Vera Sterzik. Switzerland )PS02-39)
    • Towards the Development of Semi-Synthetic Staining for the Detection of Erased Tattoo on the Living - Gabriel Emond. Canada (PS02-95)
    • An Approach Adopted in Unexpected Escalation of Crimes Requiring Forensic Scientist Examination - Gustavo Costa. Brazil (PS02-66)
    • Investigating the Weathering Patterns of Biodiesel - Prof. Zhaohua Dai. US (PS02-102)
    • Identification for Red Colored Textile Fiber by SERS - Yachen Wang. China (PS02-109)
    • Forensic Biology - the Effects of Fingerprinting Techniques on DNA Analysis - Krystal James. Jamaica (PS02-67)
    • RNA/DNA Co-Isolation and Differential Extraction of Sperm Cells in Mix Samples - Assoc Prof. Ayşe Serin. Turkey (PS02-136)
    • Developing Fingerprints With Two 1,2-Indanedione-Zinc Chloride Fomulations: A Comparison - Jackie Trink. Canada (PS02-107)
    • The Effects of Infection and Postmenopausa on the Presence of Lactobacillus in Vaginal Specimens - Assoc Prof. Ayşe Serin. Turkey (PS02-188)
    • Microbial DNA Extraction from Forensic Samples: A Test of Three Methods - Claire Cartozzo. US (PS02-68)
    • Autosomal STR data of 15 AmpFISTR Identifiler™ loci in Southeast of Iran - Dr. Arash Alipourtabrizi. Iran (PS02-69)
    • Mutation Rates of Y-STR Loci and Incidences of Non-Paternity Among Purported Paternal Relatives - Suni Edson. US (PS02-70)
    • Association Between Fluorescence-Based Sperm Detection System and DNA Typing Success Rates - Shadi Shohoudifar. Iran (PS02-189)
    • A Real Trace Evidence Case Presented as a Comic - Jairo Peláez. Colombia (PS02-173)
    • The Evaluation of Steering Performance of Unmovable Vehicle -Shaoyou Pan. China (PS02-190)
    • Validating the Effects of Fingerprint Products and Techniques on Different Surfaces in Jamaica - Gregory Williams. Jamaica (PS02-110)
    • The Development on Trace Fingerprint Detection Using Bi-Functional Nano-Composite Powders -Jinmi Jeung. Korea (PS02-118)
    • Discrimination of Single Polyester Fibers by Synchrotron Radiation Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis - Yoshinori Nishiwaki. Japan (PS02-125)
    • Reporting to the Coroner; Natural Disease and Common Trauma Related Deaths in Victoria, Australia - Assoc Prof. Ranson. Australia (PS02-137)
    • Tracing the Source of Methomyl Pesticide by Stable Isotope Analysis in a Crime Scene - Dr.Byeoung-Yeol Song. Korea (PS02-161)
    • A Comparative Analysis of MiRNA Expression in Human Whole Saliva and Human Saliva-Derived Exosomes -Takashi Taki. Japan (PS02-119)
    • Discrimination of Various Pigments for Forensic Use - Joo-Hyun Song. Korea (PS02-162)
    • Population Genetics of 30 InDels in Han Chinese Population from Zhejiang Province - Assoc. Prof. Xiling Liu. China (PS02-71)
    • Multidisciplinary Forensic Case Co-Ordination at the NFI in the Netherlands -Yvette Van Duin. Netherlands (PS02-126)
    • Identification of 9mm Cartridge Cases on the Basis of Striated Ejector Marks - Hafiz Muhammad Usman. Pakistan (PS02-111)
    • Infanticide in South Tunisia: A 13 Years Study - Prof. Samir Maatoug. Tunisia (PS02-212)
    • Copan CPA200™ Semi-Automated Card Puncher – Version 2 Performance. Italy (PS02-103)
    • Forensic Tests Protocol to Analyse Failured Tires From Road Accidents - Asst Prof. João Pereira Dias. Portugal (PS02-72)
    • Optimum Homogenization System for Use in Forensic Toxicology Laboratory - Saeid Gholamzadeh. Iran (PS02-138)
    • PMI Estimation Considerations Based on Blowflies' (Diptera:Calliphoridae) Response to Competition - Marcos Macedo. Brazil (PS002-222)
    • The AardvarkTM :  A Preliminary Study in Forensic Trace Evidence Collection - Laurence Desautels. Canada (PS02-40)
    • An Array of Heterojunction Semiconducting Metal Oxide Gas Sensors Used for Explosive Detection. - Lauren Horsfall. United Kingdom. (PS02-113)
    • An Array of Heterojunction Semiconducting Metal Oxide Gas Sensors Used for Explosive Detection. - Lauren Amber Horsfall. united Kingdom (PS02-113)
    • An Array of Heterojunction Semiconducting Metal Oxide Gas Sensors Used for Explosive Detection. - Lauren Amber Horsfall. united Kingdom (PS02-14)
    • Mother’s Language and Culture Backgrounds and Developmental Delays in Young Children - Assoc. Prof. Yen-Cheng Tseng. Taiwan (PS02-163)
    • Suicides in Old Age: The Croatian Study - Assoc Prof. Vedrana Petrovecki. Croatia (PS02-202)
    • Engineering Expertise Against Corruption in Brazil - Leonardo de Souza. Brazil (PS02-139)
    • Can You See It? The Ability to Identify Trace Amounts of Body Fluids - Hillary Mullings. Jamaica (PS02-140)
    • Underwater Decomposition and Forensic Entomology in Portsmouth, England - Dr. Paul Smith. United Kingdom (PS02-141)
    • Reconstruction of Obliterated Serial Numbers in Polymers - Cédric Parisien. Canada (PS02-21)
    • The Detection of Latent Fingermarks Using Luminescent Metal-Organic Frameworks - Xanthe Spindler. Australia (PS02-22)
    • Inside Knowledge of the Factors Influencing Fingermark Detection -Scott Chadwick. Australia (PS02-30)
    • The Impact of Substrate Properties on Latent Fingermark Deposition and Detection - Xanthe Spindler. Australia (PS02-23)
    • Applications of Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Headlights Dyes and Drugs Identifications - Yin Pak Cheng. US (PS02-41)
    • Latent Fingerprint Recovery from Canadian Polymer Banknote Submerged in Water - Peter Troung. Canada (PS02-48)
    • Multiple Displacement Amplification for the Detection of DNA on Surfaces of Deposition - Alicia Khuu. Australia (PS02-09)
    • Gunshot Residue Analysis by spICP-MS - Dr. Rodrigo Heringer. Brazil (PS02-15)
    • The Screening Errors of Cocaine Presence in Heroin Samples & Pharmaceuticals - Zahid Mahmood. Pakistan (PS02-164)
    • Vehicle-Pedestrian Accidents in the Brazilian Federal District: A Comprehensive Study - Charles Andrade. Brazil (PS02-127)
    • Excessive Fuming with Cyanoacrylate for the Detection of Latent Fingermarks on Polymer Banknotes - Rolanda Lam. Australia (PS02-31)
    • Miscarriage of Justice & Wrongful Conviction  - a Case Presentation - Dr. Murari Sarangi. Jamaica (PS02-177)
    • Speed Reconstruction in Fixed Camera Video Based on One Dimensional Direct Linear Transformation - Hao Feng (China (PS02-142)
    • Luminescent Probe for GSR Identification - Marcella Lucena. Brazil (PS02-128)
    • Fingermark-SELEX: A Novel Approach to Develop DNA Aptamers for Fingermark Detection - Rolanda Lam. Australia (PS02-28)
    • Comparison of Lip and  Fingerprints Among Twins in a Sub-Saharan Africa Population - Bamidele Kolude. Nigeria (PS02-205)
    • The Study of Influences on DNA Recovery From Different Moistening Solutions - Byung-Won Chun. Korea (PS02-73)
    • Analysis of STR Profiles From the Ultraviolet Irradiated Bloodstain by Whole Genome Amplification - Dr. Jian Tie. Japan (PS02-129)
    • Spouse Abuse in Isfahan, Iran - 2016 - Dr. Maryam Farajian Paymafard. Iran (PS02-120)
    • A New Type of Magnetic Fingerprint Powders Modified With Stearic Acid and Graphite - Prof Wei Lu. CHina (PS02-182)
    • The Metagenomic Analysis of the Samples in Cadavers Who Found in Water Using NGS - Akiko Tsuji. Japan (PS02-191)
    • Application of Dye Analysis in Forensic Fibre and Textile Examination: Case Examples Dr. Jaap Weerd. Netherlands (PS02-42)
    • Application of Advanced Analytical Techniques in the Analysis of Post-Explosion Traces - Ahmed Salem. Egypt (PS02-54)
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Invited Speaker Session: NJI Panel: Miscarriages of Justice

    Location: Grand Ballroom West & Centre, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    Learning Objectives
    1. Understanding the roles of each of the actors in the courtroom - prosecutor, defence counsel, judge, expert witness - in terms of ensuring that expert evidence is presented in an ethical manner.
    2. Learning techniques for managing expert forensic evidence to ensure fair and impartial hearings.
    3. Understanding how to assess novel science to minimize the risk of accepting bad science.
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Oral Session: Forensic Pathology

    Location: Grand Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Oral Session: Management/ Quality Assurance

    Location: Chestnut East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Oral Session: Odontology

    Location: Sheraton Hall A, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Oral Session: Criminalistics

    Location: Sheraton Hall B, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Oral Session: Biology

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 12:00 - 13:30

    Lunch Break & Poster Viewing

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Ballroom C, E & F, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 14:30

    The American Academy of Forensic Sciences Douglas M. Lucas Medal & Lecture

    Location: Grand Ballroom West & Centre, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • Dr. Douglas H. UBELAKER, Smithsonian Institution, USA
    • Deciphering Crime Systems Through Forensic Science: The Emergence of Interdisciplinary Approaches - Claude Roux, University of Technology, Australia
    • Dr. Linzi Wilson-Wilde, National Institute of Forensic Science, Australia
  • 13:45 - 15:15

    Invited Speaker Session: Violence Against Women and Vulnerable Persons and Miscarriages of Justice and Wrongful Convictions

    Location: Grand Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • 1:45 PM - 2:15 PM Speaker TBC
    • 2:15 PM - 2:45 PM Dr. Catherine WHITE OBE, St. Mary’s Sexual Assault Referral Centre, UK
    • 2:45 PM - 3:15 PM Professor Frederick R. BIEBER, Harvard University, USA
  • 13:45 - 17:30

    World Police Medical Officers (WPMO)

    Location: Sheraton Hall A, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 17:30

    International Organization of Forensic Odonto-Stomatology (IOFOS)

    Location: Chestnut East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 15:15

    Oral Session: General

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 13:45

    Oral Session: Miscarriages of Justice and Wrongful Convictions

    Location: Sheraton Hall B, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • S.C. LEUNG
  • 15:15 - 16:00

    Refreshment Break & Poster Viewing

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Ballroom C, E & F, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 16:00 - 16:30

    Invited Speaker Session: TBC

    Location: Grand Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 16:00 - 17:30

    Oral Session: Jerry Melbye

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    Dr. Jerry Melbye passed away during the final week of abstract submissions for this conference. Jerry started the first Forensic Science B.Sc. Program in Canada at the University of Toronto at Mississauga (UTM) in 1995. At that time, there were only 15 universities world-wide offering a Bachelor of Science degree program in Forensic Sciences. He was Director of the program from 1995 to 2001, when he retired. Jerry went on to create a body farm at the University of North Texas after his retirement. In honour of Jerry, we have pulled abstracts submitted to this conference by his colleagues, former students and students of his students. In addition, we honour him by including all of the abstracts submitted by the students graduating from the UTM Forensic Science program this year. The topics cover many areas in forensic science.
  • 16:00 - 17:30

    Oral Session: Jurisprudence

    Location: Sheraton Hall B, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 17:30 - 18:00

    Poster Session: Jerry Melbye

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 18:30 - 20:00

    IAFS Gala: Celebrating Canada and Ontario 150

    Location: Grand Ballroom, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada

FridayAugust 25, 2017

  • 08:00 - 08:45

    Plenary Lecture: Major Case Management

    Location: Grand Ballroom West & Centre, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • Chief of Police Jennifer EVANS, Peel Regional Police, Canada
    • Detective Inspector Bradley NUNN, Ontario Provincial Police, Canada
  • 08:45 - 09:30

    The International Association of Forensic Sciences Adelaide Medal & Presentation

    Location: Grand Ballroom West & Centre, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 09:30 - 10:15

    Refreshment Break & Poster Viewing

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom West, Sheraton Ballroom C, E & F, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Invited Speaker Session: New Forensic Technologies, Digital Evidence and Cybercrime and New Drugs, New Issues, New Doping Methods

    Location: Grand Ballroom West & Centre, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • 10:15 AM - 10:45 AM Professor Zeno GERADTS, Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI), The Netherlands
    • 10:45 AM - 11:15 AM Dr. Dimitri GEROSTAMOULOS, Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine (VIFM), Australia
    • 11:15 AM - 11:45 AM Dr. Joaquín S. LUCENA, Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences of Seville, Spain
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Invited Speaker Session: Criminialistics Panel

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    "The questions of forensic science: The five W +H (Who, What, Where, When, Why and How) or the 7 questions of Quintilianus revisited (Quis, Quid, Ubi, Quibus auxiliis, Cur, Quomodo, Quando)» Panel – Sheila Willis, Michelle D. Miranda, Doug Lucas, Peter de Forest, Claude Roux, Frank Crispino, Pierre Margot Panel members are presenting papers in other sessions that develop issues related to this topic (science vs junk science, Lucas; Intelligence, Crispino, Roux, Ribaux; Accreditation and certification of processes, Crispino and Roux; invited presentation, Roux; operational laboratory product, Willis; education de Forest, Margot). Participants may wish to follow those and come with questions! In a time of crises (NRC report, closure of the Forensic Science Service in the UK, discussions about error management, focussing on processes, etc), this panel intends to revisit the fundamentals of forensic science. Faced with a passed event and the time asymmetry of causation (Cleland, 2001), it is impossible to test what happened in a controlled laboratory environment. It is only possible to reconstruct the past based on reliable (physical data) or less reliable information (such as witness statements) and by logical treatment of all the collected information. The questions that were raised in the Antiquity allegedly by Quintilianus are there to remind us that questions can be set to address hypotheses or propositions in a systematic and exhaustive manner. Quis ?, Who ? relates to the identity, which seems to be the only and ultimate question for many (fingerprints, DNA, chemical identity, specificity). Quid ? What ? relates to the crime question. Is it a crime? and what type of crime ? Ubi ? Where ? relates to the extension of the crime scene, but also to the contacts that may arise from the crime definition (what) Quibus auxiliis ? with what means ? Use of force, situational decisions taken by the authors of the crime. Cur ? Why ? this relates to the mobile of the crime (allegations, rational decision by criminals to use an un-protected target) Quomodo ? How ? relates to the modus operandi and completes the critical appraisal of What and with what means. Quando ? When ? this is the essential historical issue of time and sequence. One can see that all of these questions have an impact on different phases of an investigation or inquiry. Faced with a complaint, a denunciation, a crime, the first phase is one of diagnosis, supported by documentation, that help direct the attention to propositions that may be tested by directing to the detection of relevant remnants or traces that these propositions imply, precisely located on the documentation. With forensic intelligence the detection may be directed to specific traces knowing that there is an on-going crime series (as in epidemiology). The detection can be coupled to « scene of crime » technologies that may help focus on the most relevant items. Incoherence, absence of traces should incite a revision of the diagnosis or of propositions to direct further searches.   This is completed by the collection and preservation of items for further analyses, if needed, often in specialised laboratories. The documentation indicates the relevance, the position, the inter-relation between items. Most of the focus worldwide is directed to this lab based phase thinking that the analyses are purely technical whereas they should be considered in a logical analytical framework. Should we analyse to singularise (identify) (Who? By what means?) or to detect similarities for efficient database or intelligent searches (Why, when, how?), or to provide an information on activity (activity level propositions (circumstances – Where, when and how?). This may direct chemical, physical or biological analyses towards more or less selective and more or less sensitive technical approaches.   Throughout, communications with other parties involved in the investigation should help decide on where to focus on the most relevant issues which may mean that some items are not further analysed, whereas others are analysed differently. Intermediate reports of different natures can feed the intelligence process, the investigative process as well as give some definitive answers (source of a stain by DNA, fingerprint, alcohol/drug level). This is all truly context oriented and leading the analyses to test the case as it is being reconstructed. None of this should be focussed on the issue (the causality), but what information is there, if a given causality is right or wrong. The final phase may be reporting for court purposes (for a very small minority of cases) and this should be transparent, balanced and focussed on the data and their meaning given the causalities as they are stated or perceived. After brief introductory presentations, the panel will include an extensive and interactive Q&A session. CLELAND, C. E. 2001. Historical Science, Experimental Science, and the Scientific Method. Geology, 29, 987-990.
      Learning objectives:
    • science in forensic science
    • problem solving as the underlying role of forensic science
    • being critical towards the technological race as opposed to the knowledge and reasoning processes involved in forensic science
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Oral Sessions: New drugs, New Issues, New Doping Methods & Toxicology

    Location: Sheraton Hall B, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Oral Session: Clinical Forensic Medicine & Forensic Nursing

    Location: Chestnut East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Oral Session: Anthropology

    Location: Grand Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 10:15 - 11:45

    Oral Session: Forensic Pathology

    Location: Grand Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 12:00 - 13:30

    Lunch Break & Poster Viewing

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Ballroom C, E & F, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 15:15

    World Association for Medical Law (WAML)

    Location: Grand Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 15:15

    Oral Session: Criminalistics & Engineering Sciences

    Location: Sheraton Hall A, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 15:15

    Oral Session: General

    Location: Sheraton Hall B, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 15:15

    Oral Session: Forensic Pathology

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 15:15

    Oral Session: Terrorism and Armed Conflict

    Location: Chestnut East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 13:45 - 16:30

    IAFS: Hall of Fame

    Location: Grand Ballroom West & Centre, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 15:15 - 16:00

    Refreshment Break & Poster Viewing

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Ballroom C, E & F, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 16:00 - 17:30

    Oral Sessions: Anthropology

    Location: Grand Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 16:00 - 17:30

  • 16:00 - 17:30

    Oral Session: New Drugs, New Issues, New Doping Methods & Toxicology

    Location: Sheraton Hall B, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
    • Professor Heesun CHUNG, Chungnam National University, Korea
  • 16:00 - 17:30

    Oral Session: Terrorism and Armed Conflict

    Location: Chestnut East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 16:00 - 18:00

    Oral Session: Women

    Location: Osgoode Ballroom East, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada
  • 18:30 - 22:00

    Presidential Dinner

    Location: CN Tower, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Canada

SaturdayAugust 26, 2017

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