Pre-Conference Workshops

Pre-Conference Workshops

Practical demonstration and lecture-style workshops will be held Monday, August 21 and Tuesday, August 22, 2017 at the Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex in north-west Toronto.

Please note: Times listed for all Pre-Conference Workshops are tentative and subject to changes.

Pre-Conference Workshops* are open to delegates and non- delegates of IAFS2017 and are now available for purchase through the online registration page here.

Full Day Rate

EARLY REGISTRATION

On or before May 19, 2017

REGULAR REGISTRATION

On or before July 21, 2017

LATE/ONSITE REGISTRATION

After July 21, 2017

Full Conference Regular Delegate USD 100
USD 120
USD 140
Low and Middle Income Countries USD 65
USD 85 USD 105
Post Grad, Residents & Trainees USD 70
USD 90
USD 110
Undergraduate Students USD 25
USD 45
USD 65
Workshops Only** USD 120 USD 140 USD 160

Half Day Rate

EARLY REGISTRATION

On or before May 19, 2017

REGULAR REGISTRATION

On or before July 21, 2017

LATE/ONSITE REGISTRATION

After July 21, 2017

Full Conference Regular Delegate USD 50
USD 60
USD 70
Low and Middle Income Countries USD 32.50
USD 42.50
USD 52.50
Post Grad, Residents & Trainees USD 35
USD 45
USD 55
Undergraduate Students USD 12.50
USD 22.50
USD 32.50
Workshops Only*** USD 60
USD 70
USD 80

*Workshops include: access to the workshop, materials, transportation from the Sheraton Hotel Downtown, coffee breaks and lunch.

**Delegates are welcome to purchase workshops without full conference registration at a full workshops only rate.

***Buses will only be provided from the Sheraton Downtown Hotel in the morning, with a return ride in the evening.

 
 

Monday, August 21, 2017

Full Day Workshops 09:00 – 16:00 (1 hour lunch break)

Behind Crimes in the Home: Family Violence Workshop

09:00 - 16:00, Training Room W2-201

  • Dr. Angela Williams (Organizer, Leader), Senior Clinical Forensic Physician, VIFM, Dr. John Gall, University of Melbourne
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

Violence in the home is a major public health issue affecting many women and their children, families and men worldwide.

This intensive workshop is an introduction to the forensic aspects of family violence and will be delivered by a forensic specialist and expert in clinical forensic medicine. This intensive workshop will provide delegates with the skills to recognize assess and respond to family violence issues.

At the end of the intensive workshop, delegates will have:

  1. A deeper understanding of the problem as a major public health issue
  2. Increased confidence in recognising and responding to family violence in practice
  3. An overview of the impacts family violence has on women, children, men and families
  4. Skills in consulting with victims of violence and identifying potential risk factors
  5. Improved skills in identifying, documenting and interpreting injuries
  6. Understanding of the principles of evidence collection and where evidence could be collected in these cases
  7. Experience writing medicolegal reports and providing evidence to court
  8. Be able to recognise and respond to child abuse and abuse of the elderly
  9. An awareness of the dilemmas, limitations and therefore opportunities to improve clinical forensic medical services to victims of interpersonal violence.

The forensic community will benefit from receiving up-to-date international information regarding a highly important and contemporary topic.  There is an opportunity through awareness and education to improve the evidence collection, and provision of evidence to the courtroom and to design better services with future cases in mind.

 

Forensic Botanical Evidence and Death Investigations

09:00 - 16:00, Training Room W1-238

  • Dr. Gerard Courtin (Organizer, Leader), Forensic Botanist, Professor Emeritus, Laurentian University, Dr. Scott I. Fairgrieve, Professor, Forensic Anthropologist, Laurentian University
  • Combination of Practical Demonstration and Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: 20

To provide delegates with a perspective on a branch of forensic science that is an under-appreciated or under-utilized resource.  The natural tendency for the investigating team to focus on the body can lead to the loss of evidence associated with the immediate surroundings.  It is clearly understood that whereas the actual analysis and interpretation is the purview of the specialist, investigators may be able to gather evidence otherwise overlooked by having an appreciation for the plants and their environment that form part of the scene. Evidence can range from individual cells (e.g., Pollen), to plant parts, to entire organisms and the soil in which they grow.  Furthermore, the entire environment of the scene under investigation may have relevance.

The workshop is designed to familiarize both forensic specialists and law enforcement agencies to a form of trace evidence that is commonly overlooked and to emphasize the role that plant material and soils both in respect to long-term PMI and linkages such as: perpetrator and victim, persons and vehicles, and secondary to primary scenes in the case of a body having been moved.  Plant and soil require special treatment for seizure and preservation for future examination in the laboratory or as evidence to be presented in court.

 

Getting More from your Forensic Lab through Technology and Collaboration

09:00 - 16:00, Training Room W1-221A

  • Eamonn McGee (Organizer/Leader), Christine McCarthy, Aleksandra Stryjnik, Jonathan Millman, all are staff of the Centre of Forensic Sciences
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: 30

There is increasing demand from clients of forensic labs to provide on-site testing and expertise at crime scenes, CBRNE scenes and clandestine drug and explosives labs. The availability of user-friendly test kits and portable instruments make it possible for law enforcement agencies to do their own testing, if labs are not willing or are unable to provide these services.

Forensic managers and practitioners will learn about current models and best practices of peer laboratories around the world that are providing on-site DNA, drugs, explosives and CBRN services to their clients. They will be made aware of emerging technologies that may be used to transition forensic services from the laboratory to the scene.

Presenters for this workshop will be drawn from the forensic, law enforcement, military, judicial and private sectors. They will be current practitioners with specialized knowledge and experience. These experts will address on-site testing that can assist an investigation in real time with subsequent testing in the forensic lab; the practical considerations of generating lab quality data in the field and whether scientific or law enforcement personnel are best suited to carry out the testing.

 

Global History of Forensic Medicine

09:00 - 16:00, Training Room W1-240

  • Dr. Jeffrey Jentzen, University of Michigan, Department of Pathology (Organizer, Leader), Ian Burney, University of Manchester, Christopher Handlin, University of Notre Dame, Matthew Sommer, Stanford University, Katherine Watson, Brookes University, UK, Vicki E. Daniel, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dan Asen, Rutgers University-Newark
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

This workshop will impact the forensic science community by illustrating the seminal events in the history of forensic science.  It will enhance critical thinking across a broad area of forensic science including questioned documents, forensic psychiatry, criminalistics, forensic medicine, judicial practices, disaster management, blood spatter interpretation, forensic toxicology and political interventions into forensic practices.  It will enhance the delegate’s appreciation and awareness of the foundations of forensic medicine and science.

Logical Framework Approach and Signature Examination: What for?

09:00 - 16:00, 2nd floor Boardroom E2-204

  • Liv Cadola (Organizer/Leader), PhD candidate, School of Criminal Justice, University of Lausanne, Tobin Tanaka, Forensic Document Examiner, Canada Border Services Agency, Linton A. Mohammed, Forensic Science Consultants Inc.
  • Lecture/Practical Demonstration combination
  • Maximum number of delegates: 30

The objective of this workshop is to present to document examiners a probabilistic approach to the evaluation of findings. At the end of the workshop, delegates should be able to apply a likelihood ratio approach to the interpretation of findings in their casework as well as be able to present their findings in court and in their report in a transparent way, and avoiding the pitfalls of interpretation.

Recent years have seen various publications arguing that the Likelihood Ratio is a logical and optimal approach to interpret and evaluate forensic findings. However, there is still a great deal of unknowns, fears and critics surrounding the implementation of such an approach in practical casework as well as on its suitability when the evidence is presented in court. This workshop aims to explain and hopefully demystify how this approach could be applied to a domain where hard (statistical) data is not available, but examiners still reach informed opinions based on their training and expertise.

 

Novel Psychoactive Substances: Don't Try This at Home

09:00 - 16:00, Training Room W1-239

  • Marc R. Pelletier (Organizer, Leader), Assistant Section Head- Toxicology Centre of Forensic Sciences, Dimitri Gerostamoulos, Head- Forensic Sciences & Chief Toxicologist, Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine, Simon Elliott, Consultant Forensic Sciences & Chief Toxicologist, ROAR Forensics, Chad Maheux, Forensic Chemist, Canada Border Services Agency
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

The high potential for toxicity and the wide-spread availability of NPSs has overwhelmed the capacity of forensic laboratories to keep pace with developing new methods for their detection. Additionally, scant literature exists describing their mechanism of action and concentrations associated with serious toxicity. The significant social, legal, and analytical issues associated with synthetic cathinones (bath salts) and synthetic cannabinoids (Spice, K2) have been widely experienced in the forensic community; however, the worst might yet be to come with the proliferation and availability of synthetic opioids. The emphasis of this workshop will be to increase awareness of forensic practitioners of the deadly potential of synthetic opioids.

The educational objective of this workshop is to introduce forensic practitioners and other stakeholders, e.g., law enforcement, medical examiners, to these new deadly compounds and to share strategies to best assist in death investigations where use of NPSs is suspected.


 

Half Day Workshops 09:00 – 12:00

3D Forensic Art in Death Investigation

09:00 - 12:00, 2nd floor Boardroom W2-202

  • Duncan Way (Organizer/Leader), Identification Constable, Ontario Provincial Police
  • Lecture/Practical Demonstration combination
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

This workshop will demonstrate the value of Forensic Art in Criminal Death Investigation, Cold Cases, and Unidentified Remains.

This workshop will provide an understanding of services provided by forensic art, expected outcomes and their value to the Forensic Community.

This workshop will elaborate on the disciplines of Forensic art, with a focus on the 3D Reconstruction, through presentation/lecture, case study and demonstrative examples/process.

Expert Witness Workshop

09:00 - 12:00, Coroners Courts (Large Courtroom)

  • John Rosen, Rosen & Company Barristers (Organizer, Leader)
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: 70

In a courtroom setting, the Expert Witness workshop will provide an insight on the most effective practices for interacting with expert witnesses, making best use of their testimony, and effectively translating their testimony to a jury.

Forensic Histopathology

09:00 - 12:00, Multi-headed Microscope Room (FSCC)

  • Christopher Milroy (Organizer/Leader), Forensic Pathologist, Ottawa Forensic Pathology Unit (Director), The Ottawa Hospital
  • Practical Demonstration and Lecture
  • Limited Space: Maximum number of participants is 12 delegates

This workshop will be conducted by Dr Milroy. It will involve teaching on forensic histology of interesting and controversial questions at a multi-headed microscope. Places will be limited.

Forensic Imaging Workshop

09:00 - 12:00, Training Room W1-221C

  • Michael Pickup (Organizer/Leader), Forensic Pathologist, OFPS, Chris O’Donnell, VIFM
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: 50

This ½ day workshop will be led by Drs. Chris O’Donnell (VIFM) and Dr. Michael Pickup (OFPS). Postmortem radiology is increasingly becoming an international standard in modern death investigation practice. The workshop will be highlighting the use of cross-sectional imaging (CT and MRI) in the investigation of death and how this non-invasive method is being leveraged as an adjunct to, and in some cases, a replacement for, classical dissection to improve efficiency and reviewability in two of the largest death investigation jurisdictions in the world. Using a case-based approach to highlight critical examination of postmortem imaging studies, attendees will gain an appreciation for common radiologic diagnoses in the context of sudden death, applications to anthropologic analyses, limitations of postmortem imaging and common interpretive errors, postmortem artefacts, and indications for advanced imaging techniques such as CT angiography and MRI.

Humanitarian and Human Rights Applications of Forensic Science

09:00 - 12:00, Training Room W1-221D

  • Douglas H. Ubelaker (Organizer, Leader), Forensic Anthropologist, Smithsonian Institute, Luis Fondebrider, Forensic Anthropologist, Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

This workshop will familiarize delegates with both humanitarian and human rights applications of modern forensic science.  Details regarding the new Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and its sponsored projects will be presented.

This workshop will also raise awareness of the nature of forensic applications in this global arena. The community will learn how to become involved and what resources are available.

Identifying Missing Migrants: The National Institute of Justice's Interdisciplinary Working Group and Missing Persons Program

09:00 - 12:00, Training Room W1-241

  • Charles Heurich (Organizer/Leader), Senior Physical Scientist, National Institute of Justice, Dr. Lori Baker, Forensic Anthropologist, Baylor University, Lance Gima, Chief (retired), Bureau of Forensic Services, California Department of Justice, Dr. Bruce Anderson, Forensic Anthropologist, Pima County Medical Examiner's Office
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

The objective of this workshop is to inform the community of the collaborative efforts of the National Institute of Justice and other government and non-governmental agencies with regard to the identification of missing migrants in the U.S. as well as Americans missing in the countries bordering the U.S. These efforts may serve as a model to other countries trying to address this issue. NIJ will also present on their National Missing and Unidentified Persons System known as NamUs.

The impact on the forensic science community will be in showing them how various agencies can work together collaboratively and use a variety of forensic and investigative disciplines to address the issue of missing persons or those unidentified. The emphasis will be on the more difficult cases where verification of one’s identity cannot be completed by a single country, where people may have traveled long distances, and with little or no notice to friends and family.

 

Inter-Professional Collaboration for the Investigation of Sudden Cardiac Death

09:00 - 12:00, Training Room W1-221B

  • Joaquin Lucena (Organizer/Leader), Chief Forensic Pathologist, Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences (Seville, Spain), Dr. Kristopher Cunningham, Cardiovascular Pathologist, OFPS, Dr. Stephen D. Cohle, Chief Medical Examiner, Kent County, Michigan, Dr. Silke Grabherr, Director, Institute of Legal Medicine (Lausanne)
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

Any sudden, unexpected or unexplained death, mainly in the young, is a main reason for a medico-legal investigation in most countries of the world. The underlying cause of sudden death is most frequently cardiovascular, with coronary atherosclerotic disease as the leading cause of death in victims over 35 years of age, whereas with those who are younger than 35, the leading cause is sudden unexplained death. Progress made in the fields of molecular biology and human genetics have identified the genetic origin of many cardiac diseases, which can lead to both, structural (e.g. HCM, ARVC/D) and arrhythmogenic abnormalities (e.g. LQT syndrome, Brugada syndrome) and result in SCD. Autopsy-negative SCD are most often thought to be the consequence of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome, and molecular autopsy is recommended in these instances.

The aim of this workshop, eminently practical, is to update the knowledge in sudden unexpected death related to cardiovascular pathology and to improve the skills in the diagnosis and approach of SCD in the setting of forensic medicine and pathology.

After attending this presentation, delegates will learn:

  1. The practical approach of the medico-legal investigation of a SCD
  2. The use of modern technologies introduced recently in the evaluation of SCD cases, i.e. postmortem genetic testing (also called molecular autopsy), and postmortem radiological examination by CT, CT-angiography and MRI
  3. Some practical cases of SCD related to medical liability

Delegates will know about their possibilities and limitations and about the new role of forensic pathologists considering the genetic origin of pathologies resulting in SCD.

Medicolegal Autopsy Techniques

09:00 - 12:00, Autopsy Teaching Suite (FSCC)

  • Michael Pollanen (Organizer/Leader), Chief Forensic Pathologist, OFPS, President, International Association of Forensic Sciences
  • Practical Demonstration
  • Maximum number of delegates: 10
  • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 13:00 – 16:00; Tuesday from 09:00 – 12:00 and Tuesday from 13:00 – 15:00
  • Please note that this workshop is only open to delegates from Low-Middle Income Countries

At this workshop, delegates will learn how to conduct the basic dissections required in a medicolegal autopsy. The workshop will be conducted in the FSCC autopsy room and take the form of practical instruction. The specific basic techniques that will be taught include: sampling for physical evidence, swabbing, opening the body, evisceration, organ dissection, and bloodless layered dissection of the anterior neck. If time permits, the removal of vertebral arteries will also be demonstrated.


 

Half Day Workshops 13:00 – 16:00

Classifying By What Means (BWM) Death Occurred: Common Dilemmas

13:00 - 16:00, Training Room W1-221D

  • Dr, Jayantha Herath (Organizer/Leader), Medical Director, OFPS, Dr. David Eden, Regional Supervising Coroner-Inquests, Office of the Chief Coroner, Dr. Kris Cunningham, Cardiovascular Pathologist, OFPS
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

Delegates will learn about opportunities for improving classification of By What Means (BWM), by discussion of:

  1. The essential principles of the five BWM classifications used in most North American medicolegal jurisdictions, and many other countries: Natural, Accident, Suicide, Homicide and Undetermined.
  2. The difficulties inherent in classifying the diverse and complex cases we investigate.
  3. Developing best practices for classification, to provide the most consistent, reproducible, meaningful and useful results.
  4. Case examples.

Classification of BWM is one of the most important duties of the death investigator. Findings are often contentious, and are important both in individual cases such as a family’s response to a finding of suicide, and in the aggregate, for example, designing prevention programs for accidental deaths. This workshop is intended to stimulate discussion about how we currently classify deaths, and how jurisdictions can work internally and with each other in order to improve the consistency and comparability of BWM classification.

Crossing Data on Missing Migrants and Unidentified Remains across the Central American-Mexico-U.S. Border

13:00 - 16:00, Training Room W1-241

  • Mercedes Doretti (Organizer/Leader), Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

After attending this workshop, delegates will understand existing modalities to exchange genetic data among other forensic data, with the purpose of identifying missing migrants among the countries of the Central America-Mexico-US corridor. This workshop will also elaborate on strategies to improve and increase the identification of remains that correspond to migrants. The identification of missing migrants along a corridor involving multiple countries implies the need to share information amongst countries and national agencies. This workshop outlines the challenges posed by cases where unidentified remains are recovered in countries that differ from the usual missing migrant communities, and the current status of data exchange in the Central America-Mexico-US region, focusing on DNA data. This workshop will describe the challenges faced by such an undertaking and the possible ways to apply this model to other migrant corridors of the world, such as the Mediterranean and Africa.

This workshop will impact the forensic science community by discussing current and potential collaborations in the exchange of cross-national forensic data, particularly genetic data. The aim being to significantly increase identifications, and also to show practices that may be useful in other migrant corridors across the globe.

Medicolegal Autopsy Techniques

13:00 - 16:00, Autopsy Teaching Suite (FSCC)

  • Michael Pollanen (Organizer/Leader), Chief Forensic Pathologist, OFPS, President, International Association of Forensic Sciences
  • Practical Demonstration
  • Maximum number of delegates: 10
  • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 09:00 – 12:00; Tuesday from 09:00 – 12:00 and Tuesday from 13:00 – 15:00
  • Please note that this workshop is only open to delegates from Low-Middle Income Countries

At this workshop, delegates will learn how to conduct the basic dissections required in a medicolegal autopsy. The workshop will be conducted in the FSCC autopsy room and take the form of practical instruction. The specific basic techniques that will be taught include: sampling for physical evidence, swabbing, opening the body, evisceration, organ dissection, and bloodless layered dissection of the anterior neck. If time permits, the removal of vertebral arteries will also be demonstrated.

Streamlined Collection and Processing of Biological Evidence in Sexual Assaults and Sexual Assault Homicides

13:00 - 16:00, Training Room W1-221C

  • Jonathan Millman (Organizer/Leader), Dr. Maja Popovic, Forensic Biologist, Centre of Forensic Sciences, Dr. John Fernandes, Forensic Pathologist, Hamilton Health Sciences, Sheila Macdonald, Women’s College Hospital (Toronto),
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

Sexual assault investigations contribute significantly to the workload of many forensic biology laboratories.  Many jurisdictions have struggled with the burden of this workload, leading to large backlogs in the processing of sexual assault evidence kits (SAEKs).  This workshop will explore approaches that laboratories and practitioners have employed to improve the collection of SAEK samples, streamline their processing and improve the results obtained.  It will also promote a standardized collection of samples and documentation in the post mortem case with various options to maximize the quality of collection of evidence, ensure appropriate documentation of injuries and post mortem management.

Forensic practitioners from the province of Ontario have been leaders in this field, introducing standardized and novel approaches that have improved patient care, significantly reduced turnaround times for SAEK sample processing while improving the sensitivity of analysis and reducing costs.  Ontario has also been working to improve and standardize the collection of samples at autopsies of suspected sexual assault-homicide victims.

The interdisciplinary faculty will include sexual assault nurse practitioners, forensic pathologists and forensic scientists.  Contributions will also be sought from practitioners in other jurisdictions with novel approaches to address sexual assault investigations and sample processing.


 
 

Tuesday August 22, 2017 – Day sponsored by

Full Day Workshops 09:00 – 15:00 (1 hour lunch break)

NEW: Achieving Accreditation: Managing the Process

09:00 - 15:00, location TBC

  • Mark Mogle (Organizer/Leader), International Criminal Investigative Assistance Program (ICITAP), U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Terry Mills, ICITAP, U.S. DOJ- Engility Corporation, Ted Smith, ICITAP, U.S. DOJ- Engility Corporation
  • Lecture

As past work in forensic science has come under increasing scrutiny, the profession needs to demonstrate a commitment to providing reliable information to the criminal justice system.  A systematic feedback loop such as in the ISO quality management model is essential in a profession aiming for continuous improvement. Accreditation ensures that processes are scientifically sound through validation as well as provides a mechanism to find potential problems and take corrective action.

This workshop will review ICITAP’s experience in assisting laboratories in the global forensic community through the accreditation process and highlight the challenges encountered in international settings.  Laboratory accreditation requires a significant investment of time and resources in Western countries.  A laboratory attempting to be the first in their country or region to become accredited faces an even more difficult endeavor.  Achieving international accreditation is a long process that requires development of a management planning, proper financial support, and administration of a rigorous quality assurance program. Additionally, scientists must understand the capabilities and limitations of their discipline to validate processes and develop reliable standard operating procedures.

The presenters will review an approach to the accreditation process that has been successful in the international community.  To highlight the aspects of a successful program, the presentation will feature a review of ICITAP’s current efforts in Mexico under the Merida Initiative, a security cooperation agreement between the United States and Mexico.  ICITAP has already assisted a few Mexican forensic laboratories and crime scene units in Mexico become accredited under the ISO 17025 and 17020 standards.  ICITAP and the Department of State share a common goal of assisting all Mexican State laboratories meet the accreditation standards over the next several years.

Forensic Imaging & Virtopsy Workshop

09:00 - 15:00, Training Room W1-221A

  • Michael Thali (Organizer/Leader), Professor, Institute of Forensic Medicine (Zurich), Silke Grabherr (Organizer/Leader), Professor, University Center of Legal Medicine, Lausanne-Geneva, Lorenzo Campana, Department of Forensic Imaging, University Center of Legal Medicine, Lausanne-Geneva, Wolf Schweitzer, Forensic Pathologist, Institute of Forensic Medicine (Zurich), Thomas D. Ruder, Forensic Radiologist, Institute of Forensic Medicine (Zurich), Lars Ebert, Institute of Forensic Medicine (Zurich), Pia Baumann, Department of Forensic Imaging, University Center of Legal Medicine, University of Lausanne, Kewin Ducrot, Department of Forensic Imaging, University Center of Legal Medicine, Lausanne-Geneva, Kirsten Busse, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

Forensic imaging is more and more widespread today, especially in Europe. Many different methods exist that all have their own strength and limitations.

Virtopsy is a toolbox of modern and advanced scanning techniques that are used to significantly enhance conventional forensic autopsy procedures. They now contain post mortem computed tomography (PMCT), post mortem magnetic resonance imaging (PMMRI), post mortem angiography and optical surface capture.

Today, different centres are starting to implement imaging techniques or are planning their introduction. In order to identify the technique of choice for a centre or a specific case, it is necessary to be familiar with the existing methods and with the formation of the personnel working with on them. Today, working groups and centers exist that allow training in forensic imaging and exchange of data and knowledge. It is therefore important for the scientific community to have an update about such information.

 

During different lectures, detailed explanations will be given about the techniques that can be employed. But also specific medico-legal questions such as the age estimation of living persons will be treated in the lectures. During the presentations, the delegates will become familiar with the imaging toolbox, the Virtopsy® project and different trainings that are offered in for forensic pathologists, radiologists and radiographers.

Additionally, the theoretical knowledge will be accompanied by practical instructions.

The work on real radiological data and practical hands-on trainings for radiological image reading as well as a demonstration of 3D-surface scanning will help the delegates become familiar with the application of the techniques.

Forensic Mortuary Managers Workshop

09:00 - 15:00, 2nd floor Boardroom W2-201

  • Jeff Arnold (Organizer, Leader), Ontario Forensic Pathology Service, Jodie Leditschke, Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine (VIFM), Rebecca Owen, VIFM
  • Lecture and Practical Demonstration
  • Maximum number of delegates: 25

An educational workshop for forensic mortuary managers and others working in a forensic mortuary, with the goal of enhancing the knowledge and expertise needed to manage a forensic mortuary. Topics include: physical and mental issues facing staff, ethics considerations, developments in the design of mortuaries, managing unpredictable workflows, and the management of a mortuary in a mass disaster.

Specific aims are:

  1. To provide an opportunity for forensic mortuary managers to discuss and improve knowledge in topics specifically relevant to this field
  2. To provide a forum for discussion of best practice in forensic mortuaries and facilitate future possible development of an international forensic mortuary mangers group
  3. To provide the opportunity for delegates to view one of the largest and most advanced mortuaries in the world.
  4. To collaborate in an emerging field - incorporating forensic imaging into mortuary practice
Forensic Science, the Bar and the Bench

09:00 - 15:00, 2nd floor Boardroom E2-204

  • Tobin Tanaka (Organizer, Leader), Forensic Document Examiner, Canada Border Services Agency
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: no cap

This workshop will benefit Canadian and international forensic scientists by exposing them to: the areas of forensic science that they are less familiar with, as well as the interaction with the legal community.

For the legal community it will offer an opportunity to learn about a variety of forensic sciences and to provide an opportunity for dialogue with the scientists.

This workshop will also provide an opportunity to learn how individual forensic science specialisations play a role in the broader forensic and legal system.  This also provides an opportunity for the forensic science community to find out from the "ultimate client" (the legal system) whether the forensic science reports and testimony are understood.

Humanitarian Forensic Action: An Emerging Field in Forensic Science

09:00 - 15:00, Training Room W1-221B

  • Morris Tidball-Binz, Head of Forensic Services, International Committee of the Red Cross (Organizer, Leader), Dr. Douglas Ubelaker, Smithsonian Institute, Dr. Stephen Cordner, VIFM, Dr. Duarte Nuno Vieira, University of Coimbra
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

After attending this workshop, delegates will become familiar with the emerging field of forensic science applied to humanitarian forensic action worldwide, including relevant normative and practical considerations for investigations applied to the recovery, documentation, management and identification of the dead from armed conflicts and catastrophes

A multidisciplinary panel of international experts will share their recommendations, experiences, and lessons learned in the practice of humanitarian forensic action. Topics for discussion will range from applicable legal frameworks; the integration of various forensic disciplines for the search, recovery, analysis, identification and management of the dead in humanitarian operations, to research needs and opportunities and future perspectives in this new field of forensic science.

Recognition and Safe Handling of Peroxide-based and other Homemade Explosives

09:00 - 15:00, Training Room W1-238

  • Eamonn McGee (Organizer/Leader), Liam MacManus, Stuart Sagara, Gavin Edmondstone, all are staff of the Centre of Forensic Sciences
  • Combination of Practical Demonstration and Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: 30

Explosives made from common household materials (HME) were used in the terrorist attacks in Paris and Brussels. TATP is a sensitive and unstable primary high explosive used by terrorists because it is relatively easy, though risky to make, and the precursors are cheap and can be purchased without raising suspicion.

Delegates at this workshop will learn about the recognition and safe handling of peroxide based explosives (TATP, HMTD and MEKP) through presentations, videos, case studies and hands-on demonstrations of their properties using small amounts of the real materials. Information on precursors, in-process and finished products and simple field tests that can differentiate between an energetic homemade explosive and a white powder drug such as cocaine will be presented. The properties of other common HME and their precursors will be presented and how they can be safely tested and identified on-site.

Role of Forensic Doctors in Clinical Forensic Medicine: An International Perspective

09:00 - 15:00, Training Room W1-239

  • Professor Eric Baccino, University Hospital of Montpellier (Organizer, Leader), Dr. Jason Payne-James, Specialist in Forensic & Legal Medicine, Dr. John Gall, University of Melbourne, Dr Laurent Martrille, University Hospital of Nancy
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: no cap

This workshop will provide an international perspective on the stakes in clinical forensic medicine and how it impacts the victims and the medical forensic community

The workshop will also elaborate on the increasing role forensic doctors have to play in order to preserve both the interest of victims and the future of our speciality, which cannot rely only on forensic pathology.

  1. Each speaker will present in detail the organisation of clinical forensic medicine in their own country (Australia, UK and France) and will present on the countries that are part of their local geographic area (Asia, Northern and continental Europe). The variety, advantages and weaknesses of systems will be analysed, providing a unique and contemporary overview of the international situation in the field.
  2. Each speaker will then present on a specific topic - child abuse, sexual abuse, elderly abuse and age determination of living persons (migrants) - in order to give practical examples from their organisations and to also provide actual and specialised information on these subjects.
  3. A general presentation of the multiple impacts of violence on victims (health, social, financial, judicial) will be given.
  4. We will show why and how forensic doctors and their forensic units have the capacity to help these victims not only from a judicial point of view, but also from a therapeutic perspective.
  5. Propositions for the future of clinical forensic medicine will be discussed, taking into account the various local conditions.

 

Half Day Workshops 09:00 – 12:00

Better Law Though Science: How Cooperation can Improve the Presentation of Forensic Evidence in Court

09:00 - 12:00, 2nd floor Boardroom W2-202

  • K. A. Fares Bannon (Organizer/Leader), Crown Counsel, Ministry of the Attorney General, Glen Donald, Glen S. Donald Law
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

As forensic science (especially DNA evidence) continues to play a larger role in criminal prosecutions, it becomes crucial for all parties to be familiar enough with the various technologies so that they can effectively participate in the presentation of that evidence. Defense counsels need access to scientists well in advance of trial so that they can consider testing or analyses that fit with their theory of the case. Prosecutors must be able to elicit testimony in chief that will assist the trier of fact in understanding highly technical evidence and applying it to the case. The objective of this workshop is to demonstrate how cooperation amongst forensic scientists, defense counsel and prosecutors will save time and money, will contribute to the best interests of the administration of justice and will further the ultimate objective of finding the truth.

This workshop is designed to improve pre-trial communication between counsel (defense and prosecution) and expert witnesses with a view towards more efficient litigation. Forensic scientists will be provided with: strategies for establishing sharing of information protocols with justice sector partners; tools for communicating scientific information to lawyers, judges and police; and, tips for responding to differing regional litigation challenges.

Bloodstain Pattern Analysis in Canada and the Implementation of Artificial Fluids as Blood Substitutes for Education and Training in Forensic Science

09:00 - 12:00, Training Room W1-241

  • Mike Illes, Professor, Trent University (Organizer/Leader), Theresa Stotesbury (Trent University), Trevor McLeod (Ontario Provincial Police)
  • Combination of Practical Demonstration and Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: 20

In this workshop, the basics of bloodstain pattern recognition will be discussed and the advantageous features of implementing a synthetic blood substitute (SBS) in education and training will be introduced.

The delegates will be provided an opportunity to analyze complex bloodstain patterns that have been created with a blood red SBS and then with multi coloured SBS.  Historically, it has been difficult teaching sequencing and pattern recognition when analyzing complex bloodstain patterns because the blood is one colour. The visual patterns can easily be conflated for beginning analysts. In this workshop the use of a coloured SBS will be introduced, where each pattern within a group could be made with a distinct colour (Stotesbury et al. 2015) with the aim of increasing understanding of and accuracy with evidence-based analysis.

The coloured SBS provides a unique and simple technological development that will cause a paradigm shift in the teaching strategies for bloodstain pattern analysis.  This novel material now enables a visual and powerful technique for disentangling complex patterns for students to deepen their understanding of BPA. Previously, this was a missing step in bloodstain pattern analysis education that made it difficult for students to conceptualize and identify patterns in complex multi-pattern analysis.

 

Cultural, Legal, and Forensic Challenges in the Prosecution of Sexually Violent Crimes

09:00 - 12:00, Training Room W1-221D

  • Marc R. Pelletier (Organizer, Leader), Assistant Section Head- Toxicology Centre of Forensic Sciences, Anita Parker, Native Service Worker, John Howard Society, Leila Mehkeri, Assistant Crown Attorney, Ministry of the Attorney General, Kelly Bowie, Forensic Biologist, Centre of Forensic Sciences
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

Recent trials, e.g., R v Gomeshi, have received high profile media attention. Misconceptions regarding the legal process and media coverage of the testimony of complainants have polarized society and undermined confidence in the criminal justice system. These issues are magnified when the complainant is a racialized woman. The information provided in this workshop will be of interest to a wide range of stakeholders including first line workers, e.g., sexual assault examination nurses, mental health workers and support staff, prosecutors, and members of the judiciary. The goal of this workshop is to support the criminal justice system in regards to the effective prosecution of sexually violent crimes.

Forensic Histopathology

09:00 - 12:00, Multi-headed Microscope Room (FSCC)

  • Christopher Milroy (Organizer/Leader), Forensic Pathologist, Ottawa Forensic Pathology Unit (Director), The Ottawa Hospital
  • Practical Demonstration and Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: 12
  • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 09:00 – 12:00

This workshop will be conducted by Dr Milroy. It will involve teaching on forensic histology of interesting and controversial questions at a multi-headed microscope. Space will be limited to 12 participants.

Human Rights- Engineering Sciences, Electrical Shock, Torture, Electrocution, Human Test Subjects, Explosives, Biomechanics, Forensic Linguistics

09:00 - 12:00, Training Room W1-240

  • Helmut G. Brosz (Organizer, Leader), Institute of Forensic Electro-Pathology, John Nixon, Athena Research and Consulting LLC, Prof. David Pienkowski, University of Kentucky, Dr. Carol Chaski, Institute for Linguistic Evidence, Dr. Laura Liptai, Biomedical Forensics , and Judge Stephanie Domitrovitch, JD, PhD., Sixth Judicial district of PA
  • Lecture and demonstration
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

After attending this workshop, with a focus on human rights, delegates will be able to:

  1. Identify electrical injury, shock, torture, homicide, mass electrocution and genocide, accidental death for various electrical circumstances.
  2. Properly document (Photograph and draw) electrical defects to the human body resulting from torture.
  3. Understand the scientific basis as to the application of electricity to the human body.
  4. The effect explosives and land mines have on  Human rights
  5. Autonomous Vehicle and pre-programmed Human rights decisions -Biomechanics
  6. Forensic Linguistics as a tool for identifying perpetrators.
  7. The Human rights of Engineering subjects

The workshop will impact the forensic science community by equipping delegates with the Human Rights issues associated with the  theoretical and practical knowledge to investigate or study  victims of electrical, bio-mechanical, explosive injuries and death.

 

Medicolegal Autopsy Techniques

09:00 - 12:00,Autopsy Teaching Suite (FSCC)

  • Michael Pollanen (Organizer/Leader), Chief Forensic Pathologist, OFPS, President, International Association of Forensic Sciences
  • Practical Demonstration
  • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 09:00 – 12:00; Monday from 13:00 – 15:00 and Tuesday from 13:00 – 15:00
  • Please note that this workshop is only open to delegates from Low-Middle Income Countries
  • Limited Space: Maximum number of participants is 10 delegates

At this workshop, delegates will learn how to conduct the basic dissections required in a medicolegal autopsy. The workshop will be conducted in the FSCC autopsy room and take the form of practical instruction. The specific basic techniques that will be taught include: sampling for physical evidence, swabbing, opening the body, evisceration, organ dissection, and bloodless layered dissection of the anterior neck. If time permits, the removal of vertebral arteries will also be demonstrated.

Using Forensic Anthropology

09:00 - 12:00, Anthropology Lab (FSCC)

  • Kathy Gruspier (Organizer, Leader), Forensic Anthropologist, OFPS, Renee Kosalka, Forensic Anthropologist, OFPS
  • Practical Demonstration
  • Maximum number of delegates: 15
  • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 09:00 – 12:00

This workshop will utilize a case-based technique of introducing the delegates to the broader realm of applications of forensic anthropologists in death investigation systems.  Many death investigation systems use forensic anthropology expertise solely for skeletonized remains, if at all.  Often the forensic anthropologist is a fee-for- service person who is not fully integrated into the death investigation system.  Casual use of forensic anthropology benefits neither the forensic anthropologist, nor the system utilizing them. The forensic anthropologist has little chance to gain more experience, and the system relies on individuals who are not experts, which puts the system at risk.

Cases will be presented illustrating the positive effects of integrating forensic anthropology in cases such as; human vs non-human, scene investigations, fire scenes, multiple fatalities, positive human identification, historically unidentified remains and others.  Positive effects include minimizing risk of a flawed investigation by using the best expert for the job, as well as cost-savings.

This workshop will be of interest to: administrators of death investigation systems, forensic anthropologists, and forensic pathologists.


 

Half Day Workshops 13:00 – 15:00

3D Documentation Technologies for Medical Examinations

13:00 - 15:00, Training Room W1-221C

  • Eugene Liscio (Organizer/Leader), Instructor, University of Toronto (Mississauga)
  • Lecture/Practical Demonstration combination
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

As with any area in Forensics, complete and accurate documentation is vital to keeping proper records and also being able to use the data for further analysis and presentation in court.  Today, there are several options available to medical examiners that are relatively low cost and can still provide a quality three dimensional record of the autopsy.  Documenting in 3D allows for measurements to be made on complex surfaces and provides the ability to measure area, volume, angular and linear data.

This workshop will present different technologies that can be used to document injuries or entire bodies at medical examinations.  Technologies covered will encompass, structured light, laser scanning and photogrammetry based systems.  Software packages and live demonstrations will be shown to encourage delegates to incorporate 3D technologies in their examinations.

Application of Quality Tools in the Practice of Forensic Medicine

13:00 - 15:00, Training Room W1-221D

  • Mamdouh K. Zaki (Organizer/Leader), Consultant of Forensic Medicine, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Dr. Kholoud S. Alsowayigh, Consultant of Forensic Medicine, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: 35

In the present day, the use of quality tools in the practice of forensic medicine is required in order to improve the organization's efficiency, productivity and quality of forensic services. Proper determination of work flow and technical procedures in a systematic approach requires the knowledge of a simple kit of quality tools and techniques. The effective use of these tools and techniques require their application by the people who actually work on the processes, and their commitment to this will only be possible if they are assured that management cares about improving quality. The organization's leaders must show they are committed by providing the training and implementation support necessary. Since 2012, the Jeddah Forensic Medicine Center is the first center in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to apply these tools according to ISO-Standards.

This workshop will strive:

  1. To understand the basic types of quality tools, and adopting this culture within an organization.
  2. To recognize the values of quality tools in the practice of forensic medicine
  3. To impart the basic skills required for the use of proper tools for process improvement in the daily work of forensic medicine.
  4. To elaborate on the use of quality tools for problem identification and decreasing costs.
  5. To show the leaders of forensic medicine organizations their roles in the development and application of these tools in an organization.
Criminal Analysis of Youth and Adult Violence: Teen Dating Violence and Homicide Crimes

13:00 - 15:00, 2nd floor Boardroom W2-202

  • Catia Pontebeira (Organizer/Leader), University Institute of Maia, Ruben Sousa, University Institute of Maia
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

This workshop will explore what happens with youth and adult specific crimes and will provide new insights on the Portuguese and European situation of these crimes.

A detailed analysis of crime scenes and criminological characteristics of the offender, victim and crime will be carried out. With this workshop, forensic practitioners will be able to discuss different scenarios from different homicide cases and exchange good practices between institutes and countries.

Outline of Workshop:

  1. Context of Homicide crimes and context of teen dating violence
  2. Homicide characteristics
  3. Crime scene analysis
  4. Discussion of different homicide scenarios (based on Portuguese data)
  5. Teen dating violence
  6. The Portuguese situation
  7. Statistics nf teen dating violence
  8. Prevention of teen dating violence
  9. Conclusions on differences between teen and adult violence based in these specific crimes
NEW: Dental Age Assessment in Adults

13:00 - 15:00, Location TBD

  • Professor Hrvoje Brkic (Organizer/Leader), School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb
  • Lecture and Practical Demonstration
  • No cap on number of participants

Dental age assessment is an established method used in clinical practice, forensic procedures and in the paleo-anthropological research for estimating the age of a deceased person at the time of death. This workshop should be of great interest to Forensic Odontologists, Clinical Odontologists, Forensic Anthropologists, and Archaeologists.

Dental age assessment is an established method used in clinical practice, forensic procedures and in the paleo-anthropological research for estimating the age of a deceased person at the time of death. Recent methods of dental age estimation in humans start as early as the time of embryo development and last for as long as there is a single tooth left in the mouth. For children the atlas techniques when comparing the development phase and the phase of erupting are used. As opposed to adults, where the tooth has ended his race and it is much more difficult to determine the dental age. In these cases person's lifetime changes on dental tissues are very useful for determining their dental age.

During the workshop, each delegate will get familiar with several different methods for dental age assessment in adults by Gustafson, Johanson, Bang & Ramm, Kvaal, Solheim, and Cameriere.

NEW: Evidence Management: From the Crime Scene to the Courtroom

13:00 - 15:00, Room TBD

  • Professor Ashraf Mozayani (Organizer/Leader), Texas Southern University, Casie Parish Fisher, St. Edward’s University, Carol Henderson, Stetson University, School of Law, Zeno Geradts, Netherlands Forensic Institute
  • Lecture
  • No cap on number of participants

Proper documentation, collection and packaging techniques are essential throughout the criminal justice process and it begins with work conducted at the crime scene.  This workshop aims to give hands on experience and demonstrations on the proper ways to document and secure various types of evidence.  It will also address the legal and ethical aspects of evidence management.

This workshop will:

  1. Identify and discuss different types of physical evidence
  2. Review the importance of evidence documentation, collection and preservation
  3. Practice evidence documentation, collection and preservation techniques
  4. Discuss the legal and ethical components related to evidence management
Forensic Photography Workshop

13:00 - 15:00, Training Room W1-240 (tentative location)

  • David Larraguibel (Organizer, Leader), Forensic Photography Technologist, Ontario Forensic Pathology Service, Vi-Chi Tran, Forensic Photography Technologist Ontario Forensic Pathology Service
  • Lecture and practical demonstration
  • Maximum number of delegates: 25

Subjects to be covered in this workshop:

  1. Importance of accuracy and standardization in the documentation of forensic subjects
  2. Proper use of measurement devices, composition and criteria for forensic photography.
  3. Methodologies for documenting anthropological remains, including full skeleton, skull, dental, matching of remains, skeletal trauma and pathology.
  4. Demonstrating the value of good technique for producing higher quality images suitable for purposes outside of casework, such as academic publication and education.
  5. Issues typically encountered when photographing tissue specimens and troubleshooting tips to overcome common problems.
  6. Recommendations on photographic and lab equipment setup and operation, suitable for all budget levels.
Medicolegal Autopsy Techniques

13:00 - 15:00, Autopsy Teaching Suite (FSCC)

  • Michael Pollanen (Organizer/Leader), Chief Forensic Pathologist, OFPS, President, International Association of Forensic Sciences
  • Practical Demonstration
  • Maximum number of delegates: 10
  • This workshop is also offered on Monday from 09:00 – 12:00; Monday from 13:00 – 16:00 and Tuesday from 09:00 – 12:00
  • Please note that this workshop is only open to delegates from Low-Middle Income Countries

At this workshop, delegates will learn how to conduct the basic dissections required in a medicolegal autopsy. The workshop will be conducted in the FSCC autopsy room and take the form of practical instruction. The specific basic techniques that will be taught include: sampling for physical evidence, swabbing, opening the body, evisceration, organ dissection, and bloodless layered dissection of the anterior neck. If time permits, the removal of vertebral arteries will also be demonstrated.

Quality Standards in Forensic Medicine- The UK Experience

13:00 - 15:00, Training Room W1-241

  • Dr. Helena Thornton (Organizer/Leader), Chief Examiner, Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine, Royal College of Physicians
  • Lecture
  • Maximum number of delegates: No cap

Clinical forensic medicine in the UK is not yet a recognized speciality, and there is a great difference in standards across the country. Many practitioners work in a very isolated environment, and one of our aims as a Faculty is to raise standards across the country.

This workshop will share our experience of setting up and running clinical examinations in Forensic Medicine (General Forensic medicine and sexual offences medicine). The Faculty runs Licentiate exams and a Membership examination, and also a Diploma in legal medicine.

This workshop will also share - and learn from delegates, on the ways of improving standards in clinical forensic medicine.

 

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